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Hylartin® V, Hylartin

HYLARTIN ® V

(sodium hyaluronate) Injection

HYLARTIN V provides serious joint therapy with heavyweight protection

HYLARTIN V is a sterile pyrogen-free solution of highly purified specific fraction of the sodium salt of hyaluronic acid that lubricates joint tissue, reduces friction and helps improve joint action.

DEMONSTRATED EFFICACY:

HYLARTIN V (sodium hyaluronate) is the highest molecular weight product available to help restore synovial health, normal viscoelasticity and joint motion quickly

HYLARTIN V:

Lubricates Joint Tissues

Improves Joint Motion

Reduces Friction

Treats Non-Infectious Synovitis

DEMONSTRATED SCIENCE:

Molecular chains bind together and restore the synovial fluid to protect the joint from continuous inflammatory assault of destructive enzymes released from white blood cells 1,2

Sodium hyaluronate is naturally found in all living organisms and has a number of functions in the body. High concentrations of sodium hyaluronate are found in the synovial fluid of a joint

For small and medium joint sizes (carpal, fetlock): Inject 2mL (20 mg) of HYLARTIN V intra-articularly

For larger joint sizes (hock): Inject 4mL (40 mg) of HYLARTIN V intra-articularly

NOTE:

These treatments may be repeated at weekly intervals for a total of 3 treatments

Horses should be given two days stall rest before gradually resuming normal activity

PRECAUTIONS:

Federal (U. S.) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian

Store at 2° - 8° C. Expiration date is stated on the package. Protect from freezing and from light

As with all intra-articular injections, occasional mild side effects may include heat, transient edema and pain around the injection site

Do not use in horses intended for human consumption

HYLARTIN V must not be administered intra-vascularly

Do not use if numerous small air bubbles are present throughout the solution

Elocom - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Elocom

Elocom

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Mometasone belongs to the class of medications called topical corticosteroids . It is used to reduce the symptoms of skin rashes associated with conditions such as psoriasis and allergic eczema. It works by reducing inflammation, itching, and irritation of the skin.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

Cream Each gram of white-to-off-white uniform cream contains mometasone furoate 1 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: aluminum starch octenylsuccinate, ceteareth-20, hexylene glycol, phosphoric acid to adjust the pH, propylene glycol stearate, purified water, stearyl alcohol, titanium dioxide, white petrolatum, and white wax.

Lotion Each gram of lotion contains mometasone furoate 1 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: hydroxypropyl cellulose, isopropyl alcohol, phosphoric acid to adjust the pH, propylene glycol, purified water, and sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate.

Ointment Each gram of ointment contains mometasone furoate 1 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: hexylene glycol, phosphoric acid to adjust the pH, propylene glycol stearate, purified water, white petrolatum, and white wax.

How should I use this medication?

Cream/ointment: Apply a thin film to the affected skin areas once daily.

Lotion: Apply a few drops of the lotion to the affected skin areas (including scalp sites) once daily. Massage gently and thoroughly until the medication disappears.

Do not allow this product to get in your eyes. Severe irritation is possible if it contacts the eye. Should this occur, flush your eye immediately with a large amount of water.

Do not use an occlusive dressing (made of airtight material) to cover areas where this medication has been applied unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Mometasone should be used for a maximum of 5 days on the face, scalp, skin-fold areas, and groin; it should be used for a maximum of 3 weeks on the body.

Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are using the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important that this medication be used exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, use it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not apply a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e. g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not use mometasone if you:

are allergic to mometasone or any ingredients of this medication

are allergic to other corticosteroids

have untreated bacterial, tubercular, fungal, or viral infections involving the skin (including herpes simplex, skin rash resulting from vaccination, and chickenpox)

Mometasone should not be used to treat:

acne vulgaris

rosacea

itchy skin which is not inflamed

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

burning and itching of skin (without other symptoms of a skin infection; see below)

inflammation of hair follicles

skin colour changes

thinning skin, with easy bruising

tingling and stinging of affected areas

Although most of the side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not check with your doctor or seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

acne-like reaction

increased size of skin rash

infected, hard sores (furunculosis)

symptoms of a skin infection (such as warmth, redness, swelling, itching, or pus)

The following side effects may occur if this medication is used improperly or for a long time:

backache

blurring or loss of vision (occurs gradually if certain products have been used near the eye)

burning and itching of skin with pinhead-sized red blisters

filling or rounding out of the face

increased blood pressure

irregular heartbeat

irregular menstrual periods

irritability

irritation of skin around mouth

loss of appetite

depression

muscle cramps, pain, or weakness

nausea

rapid weight gain or loss

reddish-purple lines (stretch marks) on arms, face, legs, trunk, or groin

signs of high blood sugar (e. g. frequent urination, increased thirst, excessive eating, unexplained weight loss, poor wound healing, infections, fruity breath odour)

skin colour changes

stomach bloating, burning, cramping, or pain

swelling of feet or lower legs

unusual bruising

unusual decrease in sexual desire or ability (in men)

unusual tiredness or weakness

vomiting

weakness of the arms, legs, or trunk (severe)

worsening of infections

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

blurred vision, eye pain, or increased eye pressure

symptoms of an allergic reaction (chills, fever, muscle aches, or flu-like symptoms that happen before or with a skin rash)

symptoms of high levels of corticosteroids in the blood stream (darkening of the skin, fatigue, low blood pressure, diarrhea, and digestive problems)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Diabetes: When mometasone is used over large areas of the body for prolonged periods or under dressings that don't breathe it is possible that enough medication will absorb into the bloodstream to affect blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, your doctor should closely monitor your condition while you are using mometasone, as it may affect blood sugar control.

Eyes: Use this medication with care on lesions close to the eye. Getting the medication in the eye can increase the risk of increased eye pressure, glaucoma, or cataracts. Report any changes in vision or eye pain to your doctor.

Infections: You may experience an infection in the treated area while using a topical (skin-applied) corticosteroid. If you notice symptoms of a skin infection such as redness, warmth, itching, pus, or swelling, contact your doctor.

Internal absorption: Absorption of topical corticosteroids will increase if large areas are treated or if you use dressings that don't breathe. If you need to use the medication in this way, speak to your doctor about what precautions you should take. This is especially important for infants and children.

Medical treatment: Inform all medical professionals that you see that you have been using topical (skin-applied) corticosteroids.

Poor circulation: If you have poor blood circulation, talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Prolonged use: Using topical corticosteroid medication for a long period of time can cause skin to thin or soften or cause stretch marks. Talk to your doctor about how long you should use this medication.

Thinning of skin: Prolonged use of topical corticosteroid products may produce thinning of the skin and tissues under it. If you notice this effect, contact your doctor

Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: It is not known if mometasone passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: Children may be more likely to experience side effects from this medication. The risk of side effects increases when large body areas are treated, when treatment lasts for a long time, and when dressings that don't breathe are used. In these situations, side effects similar to those caused by oral corticosteroids (e. g. growth suppression) may occur. Mometasone is not recommended for use in children less than 18 years of age.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between mometasone and any of the following:

aldesleukin

deferasirox

hyaluronidase

itraconazole

ritonavir

telaprevir

other topical medications that have irritating effects (e. g. retinoic acid, salicylic acid)

other topical (skin-applied) medications that contain corticosteroids (e. g. hydrocortisone)

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

stop taking one of the medications,

change one of the medications to another,

change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or

leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

More on Body and Health

Allergy Forecast & Pollen Count, Claritine-Pollen

Allergy Forecast - Pollen Count

CLARITIN ® BUY 2 MAIL-IN REBATE TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Offer valid on purchases of the following Non-Drowsy Claritin ® Products made between 2/1/2016 through 6/30/2016:

Must purchase Claritin ® Tablets 70 count and one of the following Claritin-D ® products: 15, 20, or 30 count Non-Drowsy Claritin-D ® products.

Offer excludes any Claritin ® Tablets 60 count or smaller, Claritin-D ® 10 count or smaller, and any Claritin ® Liqui-Gels ®. Claritin ® RediTabs ® and Children’s Claritin ® products.

Offer is only valid on purchases made at a retailer located within the United States. This offer is not valid in New Mexico, Arkansas and Maine. Both products must be purchased during same shopping transaction.

Must be 18 years or older and a US resident to be eligible for the Claritin ® Buy 2, Get $10 rebate. Limit one (1) refund per household.

Request for refund must be postmarked by 7/31/2016 and received at fulfillment center no later than 8/31/2016 . Allow 4-6 weeks for processing. Void where prohibited, taxed or otherwise restricted. Not responsible for late, lost, postage due or undelivered mail. No request from groups, clubs or organizations will be honored. Fraudulent submission could result in Federal prosecution under mail fraud statutes.

Unless expressly prohibited by law, payee authorizes reasonable dormancy fees deducted if refund check is not cashed within 180 days.

Valid original sales receipt and original UPC code from both actual cartons purchased must be submitted with request. Duplicated or altered documents will not be accepted. Keep a copy of the materials that you submit for your records. Absence of these documents will void any refund request.

TO REQUEST A REFUND –

STEP 1: Print and fill out the Official Request Form or include all of the information requested on the Official Request Form on a 3” X 5” card.

STEP 2: Enclose the following items with the filled out Official Request Form or 3” X 5” card.

Your original store-identified register receipt. You must circle the purchase price of the Claritin ® 70 count and participating Claritin-D ® product.

Complete, original UPC code from the actual Claritin ® 70 count and participating Claritin-D ® product cartons cut out (no copies).

HOW TO FIND YOUR PRODUCT UPC NUMBER

STEP 3: Mail these items in a postage stamped envelope to:

Claritin ® Buy 2 Rebate Offer

Grand Rapids, MN 55745-5115

CHILDREN'S CLARITIN ® BUY 2 MAIL-IN REBATE TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Offer valid on purchases of the following Non-Drowsy Children's Claritin ® Products made between 2/1/2016 through 6/30/2016:

Must purchase any two Children's Claritin ® Syrup 8oz and/or Chewables 30 count product only.

Offer excludes any Claritin ® Tablets, Claritin-D ®. Claritin ® Liqui-Gels ®. Claritin ® RediTabs ® and Children’s Claritin ® products or Children's Claritin ® ounces or counts smaller than those noted above.

Offer is only valid on purchases made at a retailer located within the United States. Both products must be purchased during same shopping transaction.

Must be 18 years or older and a US resident to be eligible for the Children's Claritin ® Buy 2, Get $10 mail-in rebate. Limit one (1) refund per household.

Request for refund must be postmarked by 7/31/2016 and received at fulfillment center no later than 8/31/2016 . Allow 4-6 weeks for processing. Void where prohibited, taxed or otherwise restricted. Not responsible for late, lost, postage due or undelivered mail. No request from groups, clubs or organizations will be honored. Fraudulent submission could result in Federal prosecution under mail fraud statutes.

Unless expressly prohibited by law, payee authorizes reasonable dormancy fees deducted if refund check is not cashed within 180 days.

Valid original sales receipt and original UPC code from both actual cartons purchased must be submitted with request. Duplicated or altered documents will not be accepted. Keep a copy of the materials that you submit for your records. Absence of these documents will void any refund request.

TO REQUEST A REFUND -

STEP 1: Print and fill out the Official Request Form or include all of the information requested on the Official Request Form on a 3” X 5” card.

STEP 2: Enclose the following items with the filled out Official Request Form or 3” X 5” card.

Your original store-identified register receipt. You must circle the purchase price of the participating Children's Claritin ® products.

Complete, original UPC code from the actual participating Children's Claritin ® products cartons cut out (no copies).

HOW TO FIND YOUR PRODUCT UPC NUMBER

STEP 3: Mail these items in a postage stamped envelope to:

Children's Claritin ® Buy 2 Rebate Offer

Grand Rapids, MN 55745-8611

Laetitia Rispel – The Conversation, Rispel

Laetitia Rispel

Professor Laetitia Rispel is the head of the School of Public Health at University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. Her research expertise is in public health, specifically health policy and systems research (HPSR). She has published extensively in this HPSR field. Laetitia has more than 20 years combined experience of research, teaching, public health, executive management, and health leadership. Laetitia is a member of the editorial board of the international Journal of Public Health Policy. She serves on the Governing Council of the World Federation of Public Health Associations, where she chairs the Global Health Equity Work-Group. In January 2014, Laetitia was appointed as the vice-chair of the Board of the Office of Health Standards Compliance, a regulatory authority that will oversee and monitor quality of health care in South Africa. In October 2014, she received the vice-chancellor’s academic citizenship award for her contribution to the development and growth of the Public Health Association of South Africa (PHASA) and to the growth of the discipline of public health both nationally and internationally.

Experience

Head of the School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand

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Ultracorten, Ultracorten

Ultracortenol

Ingredient matches for Ultracortenol

Prednisolone is reported as an ingredient of Ultracortenol in the following countries:

Prednisolone 21-acetate (a derivative of Prednisolone) is reported as an ingredient of Ultracortenol in the following countries:

Prednisolone 21-pivalate (a derivative of Prednisolone) is reported as an ingredient of Ultracortenol in the following countries:

Important Notice: The Drugs. com international database is in BETA release. This means it is still under development and may contain inaccuracies. It is not intended as a substitute for the expertise and judgement of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that the use of any medication in any country is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Consult with your healthcare professional before taking any medication.

Angicard, Angicard

Angicard

Important Notice: The Drugs. com international database is in BETA release. This means it is still under development and may contain inaccuracies. It is not intended as a substitute for the expertise and judgement of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that the use of any medication in any country is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Consult with your healthcare professional before taking any medication.

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Los precandidatos conservadores que dudaron seguir siendo azules de cuna.

Son cuatro las personalidades conservadoras a la candidatura de la Gobernacion de Norte de Santander, cada una de ellas con una conocida trayectoria en la politica, experiencia y conocimientos adquiridos con lo que hicieron y tambien con lo que dejaron de hacer por mejorar la situacion de la ciudad. al fin y al cabo metas concluidas o no, ven nuevamente la oportunidad de saldar cuentas y mejorar el panorama de Norte de Santander.

la competencia esta renida dentro de este partido, el ex gobernador Juan Alcides Santaella, por su parte, ya tiene terreno conocido en ventaja, por las personas que logro conquistar en su anterior periodo y por las que piensa convencer en esta nueva contienda, que en un principio aseguro no establecer el aval con ningun partido. Ante esta situacion se conocio que mantuvo conversaciones con dirigentes de otros partidos politicos, como el partido de la U y el partido Liberal; Santaella quien viene de cuna conservadora y durante su anterior mandato lo hizo con el aval de este partido, pone en duda el continuar con este colectivo. ¿cual

sera la razon? ¿ habran otros intereses esta vez de por medio como para no estar seguros de "conservar" el apoyo de sus compartidarios. Finalmente lo que mas inquietante que se conoce acerca de este precandidato es que sorpresivamente decidio en ultimo momento optar por el aval de su conservador partido, llevando acabo su inscripcion en la ciudad de Bogota con el apoyo particular de cuatro de los seis congresistas conservadores de Norte de Santander, inquietante es la situacion, ¿se tratara de un "proselitismo" de precandidatura entre el mismo partido?

Una cara nueva hacia la gobernacion por el conservatismo es Martin Martinez, ex secretario de hacienda del departamento, quien con su afirmacion en los medios: " siempre alegue que mientras hubiese un proceso claro y transparente, en el que todos tuvieramos las garantias de igualdad de condiciones, aceptaria la invitacion de los congresistas conservadores" insinuo sospechas en la inclinacion de alguna parte de esta colectividad hacia otro u otros colegas suyos, "no seria viable que se crearan condiciones inequitativas que terminaran en una encerrona" afirmo M. Martinez en una entrevista a La Opinion, periodico del departamento. esta afirmacion refleja la inseguridad interna que viven los precandidatos en su movimiento politico que al parecer les tira piedritas escondiendo las manos, mostrando incierta la realidad politica de los azules que desconfian de su color ideologico.

Por otra parte, Edgar Diaz es nuestro tercer precandidato, al parecer se muestra muy positivo frente a esta decision del partido de converger con sus precandidatos, el asegura que esto influye en el fortalecimiento del partido y que del modelo que se decida para elegir su representante sera el correcto. con esta afirmacion demuestra estar conforme con lo que el partido convenga y plantea lo que los candidatos anteriores no dejan ver en sus testimonios " me parece fundamental que al interior del partido empecemos a pensar en temas que son importantes para la region" sera un sentimiento de colectividad, sentido de pertenencia o una manera de disminuir la tension que realmente estan viviendo estos precandidatos al descubrir que los intereses de su movimiento se estan perfilando con nombre y dueno o al menos eso parece.

Finalmente Carlos Amarildo Garcia, concluye la lista conservadora " primero que todo hay que resaltar la actitud y el trabajo de los congresistas en torno a lograr la union del partido conservador, fue algo verdaderamente positivo lo que se hizo ayer a favor de los candidatos. la idea era buscar una alternativa que nos diera garantias a todos y afortunadamente se logro, por eso tomamos la decision de inscribirnos". indiscutiblemente por parte de los candidatos tambien existe una division de ideas y percepciones sobre la convergencia tomada por parte del partido conservador. Seguramente a Santaella no le intereso mucho asistir a esta reunion de su honrado partido politico, que llevo a cabo su conclave azul primordialmente para que los senadores y representantes a la Camara de este movimiento, lograran convencer a los precandidatos, que venian trabajando independientemente, para que hicieran parte del proceso interno del partido conservador. ¿ sera que para el ya todo estaba friamente calculado? ¿por que Martinez plantea que los procesos pueden ser poco confiables y transparentes? garantias de igualdad en condiciones pide este precandidato sin tapujos, al igual que los miles de nortesantandereanos que aun confiamos en la buena fe de los partidos politicos y sus representantes.

¿por unos o por todos?

Aunque las imagenes no revelan gran cantidad de ninos trabajando, esta es tan solo una pequena muestra que ellos me permitieron tomar. El lugar. la central de abastos de la ciudad. la edad de los menores entre 5 y 16 anos, creerian ustedes que exagero pero no, esta es la cruel realidad que viven cientos de ninos de nuestra Cucuta por la falta de oportunidades que afloran en cada calle de la ciudad.

aunque en las imagenes, prefieran dar la espalda a la camara; en conversacion con ellos, la espalda se la quisieran dar al trabajo, pero las necesidades que tienen sus familias los rebotan a las calles a rebuscar en lo que encuentren para ayudar con el pan de cada dia.

y aunque sea ironico verlos trabajar con el uniforme del colegio no es menos cruel verlos reemplazar sus cuadernos por unas carretas y canastas, esto es lo que hacen un porcentaje de la poblacion infantil de nuestra ciudad.

si, es un hecho lamentable, que estos ninos reemplacen un aula de clases por una plaza de mercado y aunque por seguir estudiando todavia no puedan hacer nada. Si se comprometen todos los dias de la semana a trabajar desde la 01:00 de la madrugada para ayudar a mantener a sus familias.

¿pero que esta pasando? es la pregunta del millon, quien es el reponsable o la responsable, tendra en algo que ver, [email protected] mandatarios de nuestra querida ciudad y la cantidad de oportunidades y desarrollo que han ofrecido durante todos estos anos. solo me queda algo por decir la politica no esta funcionando, no como deberia ser.

Funcion del periodista frente a la noticia:

La importante funcion que se debe cumplir es narrar distanciadamente, contar con las imagenes y sonidos de fragmentos sincronizados de lo que se es testigo a nuestro alrededor de forma global. Un buen uso de estos elementos permitira captar la informacion de la audiencia sin ser necesario crear protagonismos con la intervencion del periodista; solo sera necesaria la realidad y la evidencia de los hechos narrados con fluidez y espontaneidad para dar credibilidad a las palabras y la informacion que estas transmiten.

Como lograr la profundidad en la noticia:

Para poder lograr la profundidad en la noticia se debe acompanar de otro genero que complemente su informacion, por ejemplo a traves de la entrevista, reportaje corto, un informe; donde la noticia tiene la funcion de exponer los datos principales o basicos y el otro genero que se quiera emplear debe ampliar dicha informacion, buscando las causas o aportando un contexto documentado. Con la implementacion de este segundo genero no se busca resaltar la personalidad del personaje; solo se busca profundizar en causas, antecedentes y repercusiones.

Determinacion, segun el autor del texto, en la duracion de la noticia en T. V:

Son varios factores que determinan la duracion de una noticia en television; un factor influyente es el director del programa en el que se incluye o el redactor-jefe, o del equipo de reuniones que manejan estos aspectos; el segundo factor, mas importante, es el de que esta sea entendida por la audiencia lo que en la mayoria de los casos requiere su transmision alrededor de dos minutos; cuanto su contenido es mas complejo suele extenderse hasta dos o tres minutos, en estos casos la informacion tiene que ser demasiado relevante. En casos comunes las noticias deben durar un minimo de un minuto para que el destinatario retenga lo esencial. Un tercer factor tiene que ver con la necesidad de que la noticia en television consta de imagenes que algunas veces son complejas y se debe conceder un tiempo prudente para que se comprendan los detalles y circunstancias de los hechos que las estas ofrecen y un tiempo para la comprension de los conceptos.

Diferencia entre entrada y arranque de una noticia:

La diferencia que se presenta entre estos dos elementos, es que el arranque por medio de una frase busca captar la atencion de la audiencia y la entrada sintetiza los hechos mas importantes mencionados en el arranque.

Organizacion de los hechos en el desarrollo de la noticia:

En el desarrollo de la noticia inicialmente se exponen los hechos mas importantes y llamativos de su contenido pasando a una ampliacion de los datos; es decir, ordenacion de los datos segun su importancia decreciente, esta estructura permite interrumpir la noticia en cualquier momento para agregar nuevas situaciones o aspectos sin impedir la comprension de la misma, ya que esta situacion puede presentarse en cualquier momento y modificar la realidad de los hechos.

La importancia de cerrar la noticia:

Su importancia se refleja en la necesidad de separarla de la noticia que la precede sin necesidad de introducir reiteraciones de pasos unas a otras; consiste en resaltar el punto mas relevante de la noticia a manera de conclusion, cierre.

El discurso del rey es una clara representacion del compromiso y sobre todo la voluntad que se debe tener para asumir grandes responsabilidades, mas aun puesto que ellas ya vienen con nuestra existencia; el reto es asumirlas con seguridad y con la confianza que si se trabaja por una meta los resultados han de ser favorables, como los intentos del rey Jorge VI por mejorar sus problemas de disfemia y asi lograr dirigirse a su pueblo, que poco confiaba en el como lider al conocer su trastorno de comunicacion. Jorge VI tenia clara la importancia de gobernar a su pueblo mucho antes de serlo, al afirmar que su pueblo era igual a una empresa. Y lo realmente cierto es que toda empresa necesita ejercer en el liderazgo para dirigir las actividades laborales de los miembros de un grupo y de influir en ellas. Pensamiento tan acertado que lo motivo a convertirse en la voz lider para su pueblo en el periodo de guerra padecida contra Alemania logrando inspirarlos y unirlos para la batalla.

El comunicador se caracteriza como lider en la organizacion por que a traves de su discurso y de sus metodos para emitirlo divulga y relaciona las metas y los objetivos de esta emanadas de la gerencia para con el resto de sus colaboradores; creando un ambiente de buena comunicacion y de seguridad al poner en conocimiento la razon de ser de la organizacion y dar mayor importancia a trabajar en conjunto con cada una de las partes para lograr los objetivos; tomando iniciativa para desarrollar procesos comunicacionales y de esta manera fortalecer la gestion de la organizacion a traves de la informacion clara, relevante, confiable y precisa.

La evidencia de liderazgo del comunicador en la organizacion, esta en esa capacidad para argumentar y convencer con veracidad a las demas personas que hacen parte de la organizacion sobre la importancia de trabajar en equipo y de mantener en continuo fortalecimiento las relaciones laborales para crear espacios de excelente comunicacion que permitan mejorar los procesos de su trabajo encaminandolo hacia una misma finalidad que permita superar los retos de cada dia y cumplir asi cada uno de los objetivos propuestos por la empresa. Este liderazgo se va enriqueciendo cuando el comunicador logra aumentar su potencial

expresivo, explotando al maximo sus caracteristicas de personalidad y demas habilidades segun el estilo de cada comunicador para esto tambien se hace necesario que el mismo reconozca las debilidades y fortalezas suyas y las del entorno donde se desenvuelve para optar por las mejores estrategias de comunicacion que favorezcan su papel de lider en la organizacion.

El lider nace en la persona, pero es decision de cada sujeto si lo es o no; todos poseemos el privilegio de ejercer el liderazgo en diferentes situaciones, y es la experiencia la que se encarga de fortalecer esa aptitud que deberia caracterizar a todos los seres humanos. Teniendo claro que solo las vivencias desarrollan en la persona la posibilidad de ser lideres, este individuo se logra moldear basandose en la capacidad de argumentacion, el control emocional, la confianza, la seguridad, la sinceridad, y el cuidado de su imagen. Estas son y seran las caracteristicas que en todo momento deben acompanar su labor para generar confianza ante su publico de accion.

Perfil

Diana Garcia Cucuta, Norte de Santander, Colombia Comunicadora social en formacion, entre mis intereses esta la relacion cercana con Dios, la importancia de servir a los demas, de contribuir en algo de lo que tanto necesita nuestra sociedad, un buen oido, una boca discreta, una mirada segura, y un pensamiento reflexivo de lo que llamamos realidad. Ver todo mi perfil

Seguidores

Solo Dachshunds, Primadox

Welcome to the Home Page of Solo Dachshunds!

Our small hobby kennel is a family affair involving me, Paula Carter, and my daughter, Kim Vidrine..

We have bred longhaired dachshunds in both miniature and standard sizes for over 30 years. We have been involved in conformation, junior showmanship and field trial and earthdog events. Kim started out with miniatures, but later decided she preferred the standard size. Our main focus today is our standard longhaired dachshunds.

Over the years, we have had modest success in both sizes. Kim showed one of our minis, Ch Solo’s Golden Man ML. to #8 in the country when she was 10 years old in 1984. In 2005 she showed another homebred dog that was ranked in the top 10 and most notably was Best of Breed at the 2005 Dachshund Club of America National Specialty, Ch Solo’s Premiere SL. Primo was a once in a lifetime dog. In 2006 he was campaigned by Carlos Puig and ended 2006 as the number one longhaired dachshund breed and all breed system. During this time he earned Award of Merits at the 2006 and 2007 Westminster Kennel Club, Best Stud Dog at the 2006 Dachshund Club of America National Specialty and two All-Breed Best in Shows (Anoka Kennel Club and Kishwaukie Kennel Club ). Primo earned his Field Championship in October 2010 and an Absolute win as a Field Champion. Primo also earned his Junior Earthdog Title in 2012. Primo left us on April 15, 2013. He now has 50 Champion offspring to his credit. He was simply the best.

We were blessed with great mentors when we started that have remained good friends over the years. We have also been blessed with wonderful friends during these years.

The priorities of our small breeding program are health, temperament, and dogs that conform to the standard of perfection as set out by the Dachshund Club of America. We do not mass produce dogs. Any puppies that are not kept for our own breeding or showing interests are carefully placed on spay/neuter contracts in homes that will love them as much as we do.

We love our dogs, and are proud of their accomplishments. Please feel free to contact us if you have questions about our wonderful breed.

Cyclolady, Cyclolady

Cyclolady

Important Notice: The Drugs. com international database is in BETA release. This means it is still under development and may contain inaccuracies. It is not intended as a substitute for the expertise and judgement of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that the use of any medication in any country is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Consult with your healthcare professional before taking any medication.

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Comtro, Comtro

Welcome to Comtrol International

ComTrol International is recognized as a major designer and manufacturer of industrial communication and control systems for more than a quarter century. Our products are used in power generation plants, steel mills, chemical plants, paper mills, and the mining industry where rugged and reliable communication systems are necessary.

Communications

Premier communications provider

Comtrol has been manufacturing and creating high quality communication equipment and systems since the 1970's. Our brand speaks for itself.

Custom Engineering

International Approvals and requirements

Comtrol is able to provide a full line of products with approvals and requirements accepted all over the world.

Technical Support

24/7 365 Service and Support

Comtrol has a full technical staff to assist you with any needs including but not limited to custom engineering, phone support, on-site support, turnkey solutions and installations.

Product Highlight

Introducing the Comtrol Mine-Fi Series

Mine-Fi Ethernet Series is a state of the art ethernet communications system that combines fiber optics, copper ethernet, and high powered wireless technologies. The Mine-Fi series opens the doors for newer technologies like VoIP, SMS, and high speed applications.

News

Visit us at the annual RETC 2015 Tunneling show in New Orleans..

Aprol, Aprol

acute promyelocytic leukemia

(redirected from AProL ) Also found in: Wikipedia.

leukemia

a progressive, malignant neoplasm of the blood-forming organs, marked by diffuse replacement of the bone marrow development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. It is accompanied by a reduced number of erythrocytes and blood platelets, resulting in anemia and increased susceptibility to infection and hemorrhage. Other typical symptoms include fever, pain in the joints and bones, and swelling of the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. adj. adj leuke´mic.

Types of Leukemia. Leukemia is classified clinically in several ways: (1) acute versus chronic, terms that have become altered from their usual meanings and refer to the degree of cell differentiation; (2) the predominant proliferating cells: myelocytic, granulocytic, or lymphocytic; and (3) increase in or maintenance of the number of abnormal cells in the blood—preleukemic.

Acute leukemia is characterized by fatigue, headache, sore throat, and dyspnea, followed by symptoms of acute tonsillitis, stomatitis, bleeding from the mucous membranes of the mouth, alimentary canal, and rectum, and pain in the bones and joints. There eventually is enlargement of the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. Common to all leukemias are the tendency to bleed and the resultant anemia and increased susceptibility to infection. The diagnosis of leukemia requires confirmation of leukemic cells in the bone marrow by bone marrow biopsy and aspiration. Abnormalities may also be seen in peripheral blood smears.

Treatment. The treatment of choice is systemic combination chemotherapy with a variety of antineoplastic drug regimens. The disease can also be treated by a bone marrow transplant after a remission is achieved with chemotherapy.

Patient Care. Leukemia affects almost every system within the body and can present a variety of patient care problems. Of primary concern are those symptoms attendant to suppression of normal bone marrow function, particularly susceptibility to infection due to the predominance of immature and abnormally functioning white blood cells, bleeding tendency owing to decreased platelet count, and anemia due to decreased erythrocyte count. Chronic abnormal tissue perfusion, increased need for rest, and decreased sensitivity to heat and cold require careful planning and intervention. Additionally, the patient will need relief from pain and discomfort arising from enlargement of the lymph nodes and distention of the liver and spleen.

Because of the malignant nature of leukemia and the fear and anxiety created by the knowledge that one has a form of cancer, patients and their families and significant others will need help in coping with anxiety, mental depression, and realistic fears about dying and death. The financial burden of the illness and disruption of the life of the individual and the family also impose a special burden on them. Referral to appropriate persons and agencies that can help meet their needs is an essential part of the holistic care of the patient with leukemia.

acute leukemia leukemia in which the involved cell line shows little or no differentiation, usually consisting of blast cells; two types are distinguished, acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myelogenous leukemia .

acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) ( acute lymphocytic leukemia ) acute leukemia of the lymphoblastic type, one of the two major categories of acute leukemia, primarily affecting young children. Symptoms include anemia, fatigue, weight loss, easy bruising, thrombocytopenia, granulocytopenia with bacterial infections, bone pain, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and sometimes spread to the central nervous system ( meningism ) or to other organs. There are three major subtypes: The pre–B-cell is the most common, consisting of small uniform lymphoblasts that do not synthesize complete functional immunoglobulins or synthesize heavy chains only. The B-cell type is rare and consists of lymphoblasts that express surface immunoglobulins and have a surface translocation similar to that of Burkitt's lymphoma. The T-cell type has cells that express surface antigens characteristic of T cells.

acute megakaryoblastic leukemia ( acute megakaryocytic leukemia ) a form of acute myelogenous leukemia in which megakaryocytes are predominant and platelets are increased in the blood, often with fibrosis; it can occur at any age. Called also megakaryoblastic or megakaryocytic leukemia .

acute monocytic leukemia an uncommon form of acute myelogenous leukemia in which the predominating cells are identified as monocytes ; a few myelocytes may also be present. It can affect any age group. Called also monocytic leukemia .

acute myeloblastic leukemia

1. a common kind of acute myelogenous leukemia. in which myeloblasts predominate; it usually occurs in infants and middle-aged to older adults. Two types are distinguished; those that have minimal cell differentiation or maturation and those that have more advanced differentiation. Called also myeloblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia .

acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) acute leukemia of the myelogenous type, one of the two major categories of acute leukemia; most types affect primarily middle-aged to elderly people. Symptoms include anemia, fatigue, weight loss, easy bruising, thrombocytopenia, and granulocytopenia that leads to persistent bacterial infections. Several types are distinguished, named according to the stage in which abnormal proliferation begins: acute undifferentiated l.. acute myeloblastic l.. acute promyelocytic l.. acute myelomonocytic l.. acute monocytic l.. acute erythroleukemia , and acute megakaryocytic l. Called also acute myelocytic l. and acute nonlymphocytic l.

acute myeloid leukemia

acute myelomonocytic leukemia one of the more common types of acute myelogenous leukemia. characterized by both malignant monocytes and myeloblasts; it usually affects middle aged to older adults. See also chronic myelomonocytic leukemia . Called also myelomonocytic or Naegeli's leukemia .

acute promyelocytic leukemia acute myelogenous leukemia in which more than half the cells are malignant promyelocytes. often associated with abnormal bleeding secondary to thrombocytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, and decreased levels of coagulation factor V; it usually occurs in young adults. Called also promyelocytic leukemia .

acute undifferentiated leukemia acute myelogenous leukemia in which the predominating cell is so immature and primitive that it cannot be classified. Called also stem cell leukemia and undifferentiated cell leukemia .

adult T-cell leukemia ( adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma ) a form of leukemia with onset in adulthood, leukemic cells with T-cell properties, frequent dermal involvement, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly, and a subacute or chronic course; it is associated with human T-cell leukemia-lymphoma virus.

aleukemic leukemia leukemia in which the leukocyte count is normal or below normal; it may be lymphocytic. monocytic. or myelocytic .

basophilic leukemia a rare type of leukemia in which basophils predominate; both acute and chronic varieties have been observed.

chronic granulocytic leukemia chronic leukemia of the myelogenous type, occurring mainly between the age of 25 and 60, usually associated with a unique chromosomal abnormality. The major clinical manifestations of malaise, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, and leukocytosis are related to abnormal, excessive, unrestrained overgrowth of granulocytes in the bone marrow. Called also chronic myelocytic or chronic myeloid leukemia .

chronic lymphocytic leukemia chronic leukemia of the lymphoblastic type, a common form mainly seen in the elderly; symptoms include lymphadenopathy, fatigue, renal involvement, and pulmonary leukemic infiltrates. Circulating malignant cells are usually differentiated B - lymphocytes ; a minority of cases have mixed T and B lymphocytes or entirely T - lymphocytes .

chronic myelocytic leukemia ( chronic myelogenous leukemia, ) ( chronic myeloid leukemia ) chronic granulocytic leukemia .

chronic myelomonocytic leukemia a slowly progressing form of chronic leukemia that usually affects the elderly and sometimes progresses to acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Symptoms include splenomegaly, monocytosis with granulocytosis, and thrombocytopenia.

leukemia cu´tis leukemia with leukocytic invasion of the skin marked by pink, reddish brown, or purple macules, papules, and tumors.

eosinophilic leukemia a form of leukemia in which the eosinophil is the predominating cell. Although resembling chronic granulocytic leukemia in many ways, this form may follow an acute course despite the absence of predominantly blast forms in the peripheral blood.

hairy cell leukemia a form of chronic leukemia marked by splenomegaly and by an abundance of abnormal large mononuclear cells covered by hairlike villi (hairy cells ) in the bone marrow, spleen, liver, and peripheral blood. Called also leukemic reticuloendotheliosis .

lymphatic leukemia ( lymphoblastic leukemia ) leukemia associated with hyperplasia and overactivity of the lymphoid tissue; there are increased numbers of circulating malignant lymphocytes and lymphoblasts. See also acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia .

lymphocytic leukemia ( lymphogenous leukemia ) ( lymphoid leukemia ) lymphoblastic leukemia .

mast cell leukemia a rare type marked by overwhelming numbers of tissue mast cells in the peripheral blood.

Serocryptin Questions We Have Answers At Healthsofa, Serocryptin

Serocryptin is used to inhibit the production of prolactin, a hormone that helps in milk production. This is helpful because an excess of prolactin may inhibit the ovulatory process in women. It is a fertility drug that is used for the treatment of hyperprolactinemia associated disorders, which include amenorrhea (lack of menstruation), with or without galactorrhea, infertility or hypogonadism.

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Side Effects

nausea / constipation / dizziness / headache / vomiting / drowsiness / lightheadedness / insomnia / anorexia / fatigue / arrhythmia / hypotension /

Pregnancy

Animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women OR Animal studies which have shown an adverse effect, but adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in any trimester.

Pregnancy and Serocryptin Embryo and Serocryptin Fetal Weaning and Serocryptin Breastfeeding and Serocryptin

Dosage

How to Properly Take bromocriptine? What is the children dosage for Serocryptin What is the adult dosage for Serocryptin How often should Serocryptin be taken? What is the dosage for Serocryptin?

Usage

Ranitidine Uses, Dosage And Side Effects, Ranopine

Ranitidine

Ranitidine is in a group of drugs called histamine-2 blockers. Ranitidine works by reducing the amount of acid your stomach produces.

Ranitidine is used to treat and prevent ulcers in the stomach and intestines. It also treats conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Ranitidine also treats gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which acid backs up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing heartburn.

Important information

Using ranitidine may increase your risk of developing pneumonia. Symptoms of pneumonia include chest pain, fever, feeling short of breath, and coughing up green or yellow mucus. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk of developing pneumonia.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ranitidine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have kidney disease, liver disease, or porphyria.

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

Ranitidine granules and effervescent tablets must be dissolved in water before you take them. Your doctor may recommend an antacid to help relieve pain. Carefully follow your doctor's directions about the type of antacid to use, and when to use it. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of damage to your stomach. It may take up to 8 weeks of using this medicine before your ulcer heals. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 weeks of treatment.

Before using ranitidine

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ranitidine.

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take ranitidine if you have:

kidney disease;

liver disease; or

FDA pregnancy category B. Ranitidine is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Ranitidine passes into breast milk. Do not take ranitidine without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Using ranitidine may increase your risk of developing pneumonia. Symptoms of pneumonia include chest pain, fever, feeling short of breath, and coughing up green or yellow mucus. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk of developing pneumonia.

The ranitidine effervescent tablet may contain phenylalanine. Talk to your doctor before using this form of ranitidine if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

How should I take ranitidine?

Take ranitidine exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Your doctor may recommend an antacid to help relieve pain. Carefully follow your doctor's directions about the type of antacid to use, and when to use it.

Do not crush, chew, or break the ranitidine effervescent tablet, and do not allow it to dissolve on your tongue. The 25-milligram effervescent tablet must be dissolved in at least 1 teaspoon of water before swallowing. The150-milligram effervescent tablet should be dissolved in 6 to 8 ounces of water.

Allow the ranitidine effervescent tablet to dissolve completely in the water, and then drink the entire mixture. If you are giving this medicine to a child, you may draw the liquid mixture into a medicine dropper and empty the dropper into the child's mouth.

Ranitidine granules should be mixed with 6 to 8 ounces of water before drinking.

Measure ranitidine liquid with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

It may take up to 8 weeks before your ulcer heals. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 weeks of treatment.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using ranitidine.

Store ranitidine at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include lack of coordination, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid?

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of damage to your stomach.

Ranitidine side effects

Stop using ranitidine and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to ranitidine: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking ranitidine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

chest pain, fever, feeling short of breath, coughing up green or yellow mucus;

easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

fast or slow heart rate;

problems with your vision;

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious ranitidine side effects may include:

headache (may be severe);

sleep problems (insomnia);

decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; or

swollen or tender breasts (in men);

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain; or

diarrhea or constipation.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect ranitidine?

Before taking ranitidine, tell your doctor if you are taking triazolam (Halcion). You may not be able to use ranitidine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs that can interact with ranitidine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More about ranitidine

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about ranitidine.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2016 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.01. Revision Date: 07/01/2010 11:08:44 AM.

Drug Status

Nalgesin® S Ustavi Bolecino, Preden Bolecina Ustavi Vas, Nalgesin

Zakaj je ravno Nalgesin S prava izbira za vaso bolecino?

Nalgesin S deluje hitro …

Natrijeva sol naproksena se v zelodcu hitro raztopi, kar omogoca hiter prehod mikrodelcev naproksena v prebavila, kjer se absorbirajo v krvni obtok. Nalgesin S ima zato hiter protibolecinski ucinek .

… in dolgotrajno.

Nalgesin S ucinkuje od 8 do 12 ur . Zaradi dolgotrajnega ucinka je dnevna potreba po jemanju tablet manjsa kot pri ostalih analgetikih, ki se v lekarni dobijo brez recepta.

Nalgesin S hitro odpravi bolecino

Glavobol in migrena

Glavobol spada med 10 najpogostejsih tezav, zaradi katerih bolniki obiscejo svojega zdravnika.

Menstrualne bolecine

Menstrualne bolecine, ki jih s strokovnim izrazom imenujemo dismenoreja, so najpogostejse tezave, povezane z rodili, saj se z njimi sreca do 90 % vseh zensk.

Bolecine v hrbtenici

Pri 80 % odraslih se bolecine v hrbtu pojavijo vsaj enkrat v zivljenju.

Bolecine v sklepih

Bolecine v kolenu so najpogostejsi razlog, zaradi katerega sportniki obiscejo zdravnika. Na drugem mestu so bolecine v rami.

Bolecine v misicah

Nateg nastane zaradi nenadnega in mocnega krcenja ali cezmernega raztezanja misice. Pri zmernem nategu se okornosti in mocnejsi bolecini pridruzijo se oteklina in modrice. Bolecine trajajo od 1 do 3 tednov.

Zobobol

Stirje najpogostejsi vzroki za zobobol so zobna gniloba, mehanske poskodbe, operativni posegi ter vnetja ustne votline in obnosnih votlin (sinusov).

Pred uporabo natancno preberite navodilo! O tveganju in nezelenih ucinkih se posvetujte z zdravnikom ali s farmacevtom. Nalgesin S vsebuje natrijev naproksenat.

Nasa spletna stran uporablja piskotke. Z uporabo te spletne stani se strinjate, da lahko uporabljamo piskotke. Vec o piskotkih lahko preberete tu .

King Peyton Manning’S Squeaky-Clean Image Was Built On Lies - Ny Daily News, Peiton

KING: Peyton Manning’s squeaky-clean image was built on lies, as detailed in explosive court documents showing ugly smear campaign against his alleged sex assault victim

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Updated: Saturday, February 13, 2016, 1:46 PM

Thirteen years ago, USA Today obtained 74 pages of explosive court documents on Peyton Manning, Archie Manning, the University of Tennessee, and Florida Southern College that revealed allegations of a sexual-assault scandal, cover up, and smear campaign of the victim that was so deep, so widespread and so ugly that it would've rocked the American sports world to its core. Yet USA Today never released those documents for reasons I can't explain.

Mel Antonen, now a baseball writer for Sports Illustrated, wrote about the documents for the paper on Nov. 3, 2003. Three days later, Christine Brennan, longtime sportswriter for USA Today wrote an op-ed about Peyton Manning and the documents entitled, “Do you really know your sports hero?” but the scandal pretty much died right there.

Peyton Manning visibly reacts on the sideline to a loss to the Florida Gators at Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee.

(Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

Facebook wouldn’t be invented for three more months. Twitter didn’t come for three more years. The word “viral” was still only being used to describe the spread of infectious diseases.

But when the documents were sent to me on Tuesday, two days after the Super Bowl, it was immediately clear to me that had the world actually known what they contained, it’s doubtful that Peyton would have ever been the “swell, golly, gee-whiz” pitchman for Nationwide Insurance, DirecTV or Papa John’s Pizza. Certainly, evangelical op-eds calling him “squeaky clean” and positioning Peyton as the arbiter of all things good and decent in the world simply wouldn’t be the case.

But as his career winds down, we're left to grapple with the reality that there is credible evidence that Peyton and the Manning family knowingly, willingly, wantonly ruined the good name and career of Dr. Jamie Naughright, a respected scholar, speaker, professor, and trainer of some of the best athletes in the world.

On the morning after Super Bowl 50, I posted a picture on my Facebook page of Cam Newton smiling and embracing Peyton Manning after the game and simply asked why that warm photo wasn't being talked about i nstead of Cam being frustrated at the post-game press conference. It has since been shared more than 234,000 times and seen by more than 20 million people. It now has nearly 6,000 comments, but on that morning, just one leaped out at me, which mentioned something to the effect of "Peyton sexually assaulted a girl in college."

Now, I get a lot of crap posted on my Facebook page, but I decided, on a whim, to Google "Peyton Manning sexual assault University of Tennessee." That's how I discovered the two old USA Today articles about the case. Later that day, when I wrote an article on the racial double standards in the media between Peyton Manning and Cam Newton. I decided to mention the sexual assault case, and how the allegations had somehow slid right off of Peyton like virtually every other mistake he has ever made in his career.

Less than 24 hours later, a source who claimed to see my article on the racial double standard, sent me a 74-page court document from Polk County court in Florida. Sitting in the San Francisco airport, waiting for a flight home, I opened the PDF, began reading, and felt like I had stumbled on to state secrets. I literally moved to where nobody could see my computer screen.

While Peyton Manning is not the president of the United States, in a land where football is king, he is the Captain America of sports and certainly one of the best quarterbacks of all time. He's also a prolific pitchman, the friendly face of several multi-billion dollar corporations.

This document says, in essence, that it's all a facade, an act, a well-designed for-profit creation, maintained and manicured at all cost. For me, it was like reading proof that the first Apollo moon landing was really a fictional tale filmed in a Hollywood studio designed to dupe us all. That flag, planted in the moon, seemingly blowing in the wind, was a ruse after all. Maybe B. o.B. was right on this one fact.

I read every single page in the airport before I boarded my flight. Maybe a good hundred times, I wondered to myself, Why — and how — had all of this been kept secret for so long?

Titled "Facts of the Case," and submitted to the court by the plaintiff's lawyers, the document, which warrants many more takes and reflections than what I will offer today, is simultaneously shocking, disgusting, painful, and infuriating. It offers us the living, breathing human names and faces of the individuals the American sports machine is willing to mow down in the name of profit and fame.

To begin with, Dr. Jamie Naughright was not "a girl" sexually assaulted by Peyton Manning; she was an esteemed professional widely admired by students and peers alike at the University of Tennessee, where she was the Director of Health & Wellness for the Men's Athletic Program. Originally from New Jersey, Naughright had made Knoxville her home away from home.

In 1991, she earned her B. A. from the University of Tennessee in Exercise Physiology with a Minor in Football Coaching (I didn't even know such a minor existed). A year later, with a 3.7 GPA, she earned her Master's Degree in Health Education and Promotion. A few years later, with a 3.925 GPA, she earned her doctorate from the University of Tennessee in Health Education and Wellness.

In fact, Jamie Naughright had been a staple across all sports programs at the University of Tennessee and had more tenure than most of the football staff, including the head coach at the time, Phillip Fulmer.

Dr. Jamie Naughright is a respected scholar, speaker, professor, and trainer of some of the best athletes in the world.

Starting as a student in 1988, Naughright devoted her entire life to the University of Tennessee athletic program. She was a student trainer for the women's athletic programs and a supervisor for intramural sports on campus. From 1989-91, she was the student trainer for the men's athletic department. After earning her bachelor's degree and entering grad school, she became the graduate assistant trainer for the men's athletic program for two years. Gifted and respected throughout the campus, she was hired as the assistant trainer for the entire men's athletic program in 1993, following a year as a full-time intern.

After two years in that role, she was hired as the Director of Health and Wellness for the Men's Athletic Program. In that position she developed widely acclaimed educational and medical programs for students and oversaw the drug testing of all of the male athletes. She presented academic papers, served as an instructor and lecturer for college courses, and traveled frequently with students and staff to conferences all over the country. She started successful community projects and raised funds for local charities.

While serving as the Director of Health and Wellness, Naughright also was the head trainer for Tennessee's track and field program, which includes cross country, indoor, and outdoor athletics. In that position she hired and trained 25 staff members, oversaw all medical care for every track and field athlete, served as the medical director for large events, coordinated annual physicals and supervised weekly drug testing. So many athletes — which would eventually include medal-winning Olympians — developed such a deep respect for Dr. Naughright that she would be requested to travel with them to international events and world championships.

PEYTON MANNING INCIDENT CITED IN NEW LAWSUIT

In addition to all of her other responsibilities, Naughright served as the associate athletic trainer for the men's football program. Where you live probably determines how much you know or care about Southeastern Conference football. But in small - to medium-sized cities across the south — places like Knoxville, Tuscaloosa, Baton Rouge, Gainesville — SEC football is just a little more important than God. The years Naughright was employed as the associate trainer by the men's football program, from 1996-98, were arguably the three best years in the modern history of the program, as the team won back-to-back SEC championships and the national title. Dr. Jamie Naughright was as an absolute force of nature in the University of Tennessee's sports program.

At that time, Naughright's education, training and ascension through the ranks of the University of Tennessee's athletic program should have culminated, after more than 10 years of service to the institution, with her being able to land any job she wanted. When football teams win SEC championships and national titles, key employees can pretty much dictate where in the sports world they want to work next. If Dr. Jamie Naughright was a man that likely would've been the case for her as well.

As an undergraduate in 1989, Naughright, who had interned for a year with the women's athletic programs (including the world-famous UT women's basketball team), was transferred to the men's programs. According to court documents and affidavits, her boss, associate trainer Mike Rollo, perceived Naughright to be a lesbian. Rollo, who had just left working with a group of young women he also thought to be lesbians, allegedly began calling Naughright "c--t bumper." This wasn't a rare occurrence or something he said to her only in private; he allegedly called her that in front of others. For three years, until 1992, when Naughright built up enough courage to complain, she said she was almost exclusively called "c--t bumper," or "bumper" for short, by a variety of staff members in the program (see court documents, pages 5-7; all subsequent references are to these).

According to the allegations in the documents, Rollo regularly referred to the women's teams, known as the Lady Volunteers, as the Lady Lickers. Naughright, who is not a lesbian, said she was told by Rollo that she would just have to get used to hearing such vulgarities. Since she was one of the first women to work in the men's program, the 20-year-old Naughright decided to endure the abuse if it meant she could serve as a pioneer of sorts for women in sports. After Naughright issued a formal complaint, Rollo and other staff members allegedly were ordered by administrators to cease the practice. While the name "c--t bumper" ceased, Rollo and the staff continued to call her "bumper" and would frequently add other sexual adjectives to it (see page 8).

Determined to persevere without jeopardizing her career, Naughright began writing policies for the program prohibiting foul or abusive language. First she instituted the policies for athletic training rooms, then later the male cheerleading program. Eventually she would train a variety of student athletes on the proper and professional use of appropriate language.

In the fall of 1994, Peyton Manning entered the University of Tennessee football program as the already-famous son of legendary college and pro football star Archie Manning. That semester, his first on campus, some type of incident involving Manning and Naughright occurred. By request of the counsel of Peyton Manning, the details of that incident have been sealed and three-and-a-half pages concerning it have been redacted from the permanent record (see pages 11-14).

Whatever happened, Naughright claims it colored and informed the professional interactions between Naughright and Manning from that time on and caused Manning to consistently harbor anger toward her. Yet in spite of the drama, Naughright served as the medical director for the NCAA Track and Field Championships in 1995 and was a member of the training staff for the Olympics trials for the 1996 Games in Atlanta.

To say that her problems with Peyton Manning boiled over in 1996 would be understating it.

On Feb. 29 of that year, Naughright, at that point the university's director of health and wellness, was in a training room, examining what she thought might be a possible stress fracture in Manning's foot. At 6 feet, 5 inches, his feet dangled off the edge of the table. Manning allegedly then proceeded to scoot down the training table while Naughright examined his foot. At that point, she said, he forcefully maneuvered his naked testicles and rectum directly on her face with his penis on top of her head. Shocked, disgusted, and offended, Naughright pushed Manning away, removing her head out from under him (see pages 14-15). Within hours, she reported the incident to the Sexual Assault Crisis Center in Knoxville (see page 18).

According to the court records, Manning initially denied the incident ever took place. It was a calculated risk. He was the star quarterback, a Heisman trophy hopeful, and a likely No. 1 pick in the NFL Draft. While Naughright was now a respected member of the staff, Manning was the star, the savior of Tennessee football. It was his word against hers.

While Peyton Manning is not the president of the United States, in a land where football is king, he is the Captain America of sports and certainly one of the best quarterbacks of all time.

(Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

When Rollo learned of the complaint, he allegedly concocted a story that Manning actually pulled down his pants to moon another student-athlete, Malcolm Saxon, who was nearby. According to Rollo, after mooning the student, Naughright just happened to move her head right into Manning's pelvic region. Rollo acknowledged under oath that he was the first person to use the word “mooning.”

One person, though, could settle all of this: Malcolm Saxon.

And, in fact, he did settle it. In an affidavit, Saxon refuted Manning's story and made it clear that Manning never mooned him. In a letter to Manning, Saxon, who stated that he lost his eligibility as a student-athlete over it, practically begged him to come forward and tell the truth (see page 20). Here's an excerpt from the letter:

"First, I have stuck to my same story throughout this drama. I told Mike Rollo the next day and Coach Fulmer a week or two afterwards. I had nothing to hide at that point and I have nothing to hide today. I have never been on Jamie's side or on your side (contrary to what the athletic department was telling you and telling her). I stuck to the truth and I lost my eligibility for it. My redshirt request sat on Mike Rollo's desk for months as the process was going forward. I'm not angry about it anymore, just getting a little tired of it!!

"Peyton, you messed up. I still don't know why you dropped your drawers. Maybe it was a mistake, maybe not. But it was definitely inappropriate. Please take some personal responsibility here and own up to what you did. I never understood why you didn't admit to it. "

Saxon goes on to tell Peyton things like:

"Coming clean is the right thing to do.

NFL stars Peyton Manning (r.), Jerome Bettis (l.) and Papa John's Founder John Schnatter enjoy Papa John's pizza and Pepsi MAX during a commercial shoot.

(AJ Mast/AP IMAGES PAPA JOHN?S)

You have shown no mercy or grace to this lady who was on her knees seeing if you had a stress fracture.

You might as well maintain some dignity and admit to what happened.

Your celebrity doesn't mean that you can treat folks this way."

For anybody other than Peyton Manning, such damning statements from a fellow student who had no dog in the fight would have been the nail in their coffin. As a general rule, it's not just gross to smash your testicles on a woman's face, it's a crime.

I'm embarrassed to even be typing such things, but imagine if a grown man forced his genitals on to the face of your daughter or sister or mother or beloved colleague. What would you think about that? Would you tell your wife, "Well, that's gross, honey. How was the rest of your day?" Would you ask your daughter, "What she did to deserve that?" Of course you wouldn't. You'd be outraged.

When Rollo was asked, under oath, if the woman he had known for more than seven years would respond in such a way to being mooned, he repeatedly said no (see pages 15-16). Yet he allegedly concocted the mooning narrative, nonetheless.

Instead, the school asked Naughright to leave. Having poured her heart and soul out to the University of Tennessee for nearly 10 years, she agreed, as a part of a settlement agreement, to part ways.

Before she left, though, two staff members of the school, according to the documents, asked Naughright if she would consider blaming the entire incident not on Manning, but on another athlete — a black one. According to Naughright, the staff members (named as Mr. Wyant and Mr. Rollo) went so far as to actually name a specific black athlete she could blame it on. Of course, she refused (see pages 18-19).

In her remaining time at the university, Naughright testified that Manning, in her presence, on two separate occasions, deliberately reenacted the sexual assault on other student athletes to terrorize her. On another occasion he allegedly called her a "bitch" in front of other athletes after snatching a marker used to label drug-test specimens from her hand and throwing it across the room (see page 22).

When Naughright finally left the University of Tennessee it was both heartbreaking and a great relief. She was hired to be an assistant professor and the program director of the Athletic Education Training Program at Florida Southern College. For more than three years she served Florida Southern with great distinction. She received, according to the court documents, regular raises, outstanding reviews, and was credited for helping grow the program in measurable ways.

In 1998, she served as the head athletic trainer for the U. S. women's track and field program in Beijing. Two years later, she was hired to be the head athletic trainer for the both the men's and women's USA track and field teams in their competition versus Canada. Her professional life had clearly turned a corner. Beloved both by athletes and her colleagues, Naughright had decided she'd never discuss the sexual assault by Manning publicly. In fact, both she and Manning signed a confidentiality agreement when she left the University of Tennessee that they would not discuss it.

Yet, in 2001, after moving on and revitalizing her career, everything came crashing down again. Now a quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts, and more famous than ever, Manning violated the confidentiality agreement in a way that could not be undone. It has scarred Naughright like a scarlet letter to this very day.

On May 16th, 2001, Naughright returned to Florida after accompanying her students on an educational and medical trip to South Africa. When she arrived at her office, she found a large manilla envelope in a receptacle on her door with the words "Dr. Vulgar Mouth Whited" printed on it (see page 1). Whited was Naughright's married name for most of her time at the University of Tennessee. She was immediately disturbed. Other employees testified that the envelope had been there for a few days before she arrived home from South Africa.

In it, were Xerox copies from some type of publication. It appeared to be written by Peyton Manning and it was about her. Colleagues who saw her after opening it testified that she was shaken up by what she read. Manning and his father, Archie, had written a book called "The Mannings" and perhaps wanting to put their stamp on the incident in Knoxville before it ever reached the public, they threw Naughright under bus.

Her supervisor at Florida Southern had already opened the envelope and read what was in it. What Manning said about her ruined her career at Florida Southern and in college athletics once and for all. After years of amazing reviews and great work at the university, the controversy from the book and the stress it created eventually caused Dr. Jamie Naughright to be let go, once again, for doing nothing wrong.

It appears that Peyton and Archie Manning thought Naughright would accept what they did to her quietly. They were wrong. This time, she did file suit against Peyton Manning, Archie Manning, the ghostwriter John Underwood, and the publisher Harper Collins. Manning and his lawyers asked for the case to be dismissed, but Polk County Circuit Judge Harvey A. Kornstein not only denied the motion but put Peyton Manning, his father, and the others on blast. In his statement, he said:

"Even if the plaintiff is a public figure, the evidence of record contains sufficient evidence to satisfy the court that a genuine issue of material fact exists that would allow a jury to find, by clear and convincing evidence, the existence of actual malice of the part of the defendants.

"Specifically, there is evidence of record, substantial enough to suggest that the defendants knew that the passages in question were false, or acted in reckless disregard of their falsity. There is evidence of record to suggest that there were obvious reasons to doubt the veracity of Peyton Manning's account of the incident in question. The court further finds that there is sufficient evidence to permit the conclusion that the defendants entertained serious doubts as to the truth of the passages in this case."

In other words, Judge Kornstein said that there is evidence to support the conclusion that Peyton Manning lied in his book about the incidents and knew that he was lying about the incidents.

Under deposition, it was learned from their ghostwriter, John Underwood, that Archie Manning, speaking of Dr. Jamie Naughright said, "He didn't really like this girl" (see page 24).

Playing a bit of good cop, bad cop, Peyton said, "I certainly didn't dislike her. I thought she had a vulgar mouth, but I always tried to be nice." Peyton went on to describe a few favors that he did for Dr. Naughright, including one on a trip to Virginia, where, at Naughright's request, he gave some younger students a ride somewhere (see page 25).

When forced to testify about this incident in a deposition, attorneys asked Peyton to describe a specific incident when Dr. Naughright had a "vulgar mouth." He could only think of one — it was during the Virginia trip. According to Manning, Dr. Naughright said to him, "These motherf---ers are yours. Get these motherf---ers off my hands for a little while."

Archie Manning walks on the sideline before an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in New Orleans.

It appears that Manning, who was under oath, completely concocted this story out of thin air. Again, just as he expected the student athlete, Malcolm Saxon, to go along with the story of his mooning Naughright, he assumed that the plethora of witnesses in Virginia would also go along with his new lie. Unfortunately for him, they didn't (see page 26).

On the trip to Charlottesville, Va. five University of Tennessee students were selected to go to the NCAA's annual APPLE Conference, a training symposium on substance-abuse prevention and health promotion for student athletes and athletic department administrators. One was Manning. Three were teammates from the football team: Eric Lane, Scott Pfeiffer and Tyrone Hines. The last, Geno Devane, was a track and field athlete.

The other four students, all juniors and seniors, were all older than Manning, who was a sophomore. Under oath, they each testified that Manning never gave them a ride anywhere that night and never would have. It was a peculiar story. But the strangest — and most damning — part of their testimony, though, was that they each made it abundantly clear that they never heard Naughright say one vulgar word that night or any other. Devane, a medical student at the time of his testimony, said, "I can assure you that I would remember. I would have been very upset if that had occurred. That type of language would have been completely out of character because she was always very professional around me and other student-athletes."

Furthermore, Devane recalls very clearly who drove the athletes that night and it wasn't Manning; it was Eric Lane (see page 28).

Devane's testimony gets even more damning. Line by line, and statement by statement, he repeatedly testifies, "I unequivocally state that this did not occur," regarding virtually every aspect of the story Manning concocted.

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Denver Broncos defense slows Cam Newton, Panthers to win Super Bowl 50

For some, the testimony of Eric Lane can be considered even worse than that of Devane. Lane was not only Manning's teammate, but also his fullback on offense. At the time of his testimony he was an employee of the University of Tennessee and in the final year of law school. He also testified that he could not recall any such thing ever being said or done by Naughright (see page 29).

Jill Griffin, the head of the Metropolitan Drug Commission in Knoxville, who was also on the trip, roomed with Naughright and spent a great deal of time with her, testified that she never heard Naughright say a vulgar word over the entire history of them knowing each other and, furthermore, that she never heard her calling students by vulgar names. In fact, Griffin testified that Naughright was exceedingly professional at all times with the students (see pages 30-33).

While not personal friends, Griffin and Naughright worked together on the drug commission for over three years. She testified that she was an "excellent board member," and that she "had a good reputation in the Knoxville community and on the Metropolitan Drug Commission."

A 1997 photo of Peyton Manning.

But it gets worse. Much worse.

Soon after the alleged sexual assault, records show that Manning told the school, "I have never approved of Jamie's vulgar language. It has always been my opinion, along with the majority of the team, that Jamie wants to be one of the guys."

To his father, he concocted far worse lies that were torn apart, one by one, when he and others were forced to testify under oath. He told his father, Archie, "she's kind of trashy," and "had the most vulgar mouth of any girl he'd ever seen" and "was unattractive but had big breasts" and had "been out with a bunch of black guys" and "had a toilet mouth."

Under oath, the ghostwriter, John Underwood revealed that Archie Manning suggested to him that Naughright was going into the dorms and having sex with large numbers of black student athletes. After saying that she was up in the dorms with black students, Archie, states:

"And, she'd, she'd, been up in the dorm before, I mean hey, you know, they could have, you know, could have pulled off stuff on her too. Ah, she, toilet mouth, ah Peyton told me he never did like her, but he always did, cause what I'd told him to do, ah, I instructed him to be nice to the tr - … don't ever look down on a trainer or an equipment person you know."

According to the records, attorneys for Naughright drilled person after person, staff member after staff member, asking them to identify an instance where they heard Naughright use vulgar language. Not a single person could do so. One after another, those who claimed she was promiscuous admitted under oath that they didn't have any evidence to support such claims. Instead, everyone, to the person, claimed they had just heard such charges from somebody who heard from somebody that it might be true (see pages 37-40). No one with firsthand knowledge testified to her ever being vulgar or having sexual relationships with student athletes.

In fact, the opposite was true.

Lawrence Johnson, an Olympic silver medalist and gold medalist at the World Indoor Games, testified at great length to the character, compassion, professionalism, and overall amazing nature of Dr. Jamie Naughright (see pages 42-43). He testified that he believed he had attended at least 80 different local, national, and international events with her and that he had not heard her use a single vulgar word in the 10 years he had known and worked with her. He testified that she was "professional and proper" in her conduct, appearance, and demeanor. He went on testify how she came to check on him at his bedside after surgeries and traveled with him to meets all over the world to ensure his peak performance.

Another student athlete, Antonio Brewer, who has known Naughright since 1995, testified that he personally knew her to have high moral character and that her reputation for being a moral person was actually well-known at the university. He testified that he had never heard her use vulgar language of any kind (see page 43) and that he was deeply offended by the racist suggestion made by Archie Manning that she was sleeping around with black athletes.

Until this very day, have you ever seen a single interview with Dr. Jamie Naughright trashing Peyton Manning? Me neither. I never knew that any of this happened until last week. My understanding is that she has not worked in college athletics since being let go from Florida Southern.

The defamation suit was settled in 2003 but terms were not disclosed. Naughright settled her suit against the University of Tennessee for a reported $300,000.

The book, which trashes the character of Dr. Jamie Naughright, continues to be sold to this very day, while Peyton Manning continues to benefit from his reputation not only as a superstar quarterback, but also an individual of high moral character. In fact, he has reaped tens of millions of dollars in endorsement deals based on a fraudulent mystique he's cultivated as a good guy, an upstanding citizen, the ideal professional athlete.

This document alone puts the lie to all this. He hasn't come close to apologizing for sexually assaulting Dr. Jamie Naughright. Quite the contrary, he besmirched her stellar reputation and character. The price he should have paid for what he did her — at very least — she has ended up paying over and over again, both at the University of Tennessee and, later, at Florida Southern.

Azicin; Tablet, Acel Pharma Pvt, Azicin

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Composit uses/ indication of AZICIN :

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Composit contra indication of AZICIN :

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Composit side effects of AZICIN :

Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, dyspepsia, flatulence, dizziness, headache, vertigo.

Composit caution of AZICIN :

Pseudomembranous colitis, impaired liver function, impaired renal function, antacids containing aluminium and magnesium, children.

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Fluoxetine Advanced Patient Information, Hapilux

fluoxetine (Oral route)

Oral route(Capsule;Capsule, Delayed Release)

Antidepressants can increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults with major depressive disorder. Closely monitor patients of all ages for clinical worsening and emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. When using Prozac and olanzapine in combination, also refer to the Boxed Warning section of the package insert for Symbyax(R) .

Antidepressants can increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults with major depressive disorder. Closely monitor patients of all ages for clinical worsening and emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Prozac(R) is approved for use in pediatric patients with MDD and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) .

Antidepressants can increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults with major depressive disorder. Closely monitor patients of all ages for clinical worsening and emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Sarafem(R) is not approved for use in pediatric patients .

Commonly used brand name(s)

Available Dosage Forms:

Therapeutic Class: Antidepressant

Pharmacologic Class: Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor

Uses For fluoxetine

Fluoxetine is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), bulimia nervosa, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), and panic disorder. It is also used together with olanzapine to treat depression that is part of bipolar disorder.

Fluoxetine is an antidepressant and belongs to a group of medicines known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). fluoxetine works by increasing the activity of a chemical called serotonin in the brain.

fluoxetine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using fluoxetine

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For fluoxetine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to fluoxetine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of fluoxetine in children. However, safety and efficacy have not been established to treat depression in children younger than 8 years of age, and to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder in children younger than 7 years of age.

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of fluoxetine in children with bulimia nervosa or panic disorder . Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of fluoxetine in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have hyponatremia (low sodium in the blood) than younger adults, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving fluoxetine.

Pregnancy

Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women.

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking fluoxetine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using fluoxetine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Amifampridine

Bepridil

Cisapride

Clorgyline

Dronedarone

Furazolidone

Iproniazid

Isocarboxazid

Levomethadyl

Linezolid

Mesoridazine

Methylene Blue

Metoclopramide

Moclobemide

Nialamide

Pargyline

Phenelzine

Pimozide

Piperaquine

Procarbazine

Rasagiline

Saquinavir

Selegiline

Sparfloxacin

Terfenadine

Thioridazine

Toloxatone

Tranylcypromine

Ziprasidone

Using fluoxetine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Abciximab

Abiraterone

Acecainide

Aceclofenac

Acemetacin

Acenocoumarol

Ajmaline

Alfuzosin

Almotriptan

Amineptine

Amiodarone

Amisulpride

Amitriptyline

Amitriptylinoxide

Amoxapine

Amphetamine

Amtolmetin Guacil

Anagrelide

Ancrod

Anisindione

Antithrombin III Human

Apixaban

Apomorphine

Aprindine

Ardeparin

Argatroban

Aripiprazole

Arsenic Trioxide

Asenapine

Aspirin

Astemizole

Atazanavir

Azimilide

Azithromycin

Bedaquiline

Bivalirudin

Bretylium

Bromfenac

Brompheniramine

Bufexamac

Bupropion

Buserelin

Carbamazepine

Carvedilol

Celecoxib

Certoparin

Chloral Hydrate

Chloroquine

Chlorpheniramine

Chlorpromazine

Choline Salicylate

Cilostazol

Cinacalcet

Ciprofloxacin

Citalopram

Clarithromycin

Clomipramine

Clonixin

Clopidogrel

Clozapine

Cobicistat

Cocaine

Codeine

Crizotinib

Cyclobenzaprine

Dabigatran Etexilate

Dabrafenib

Dalteparin

Danaparoid

Darunavir

Dasatinib

Defibrotide

Degarelix

Delamanid

Dermatan Sulfate

Desipramine

Desirudin

Deslorelin

Desvenlafaxine

Dexfenfluramine

Dexibuprofen

Dexketoprofen

Dextroamphetamine

Dextromethorphan

Dibenzepin

Diclofenac

Dicumarol

Diflunisal

Dipyridamole

Dipyrone

Disopyramide

Dofetilide

Dolasetron

Domperidone

Donepezil

Doxepin

Doxorubicin

Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Liposome

Droperidol

Drotrecogin Alfa

Duloxetine

Ebastine

Eletriptan

Eliglustat

Enflurane

Enoxaparin

Eptifibatide

Eribulin

Erythromycin

Escitalopram

Etodolac

Etofenamate

Etoricoxib

Famotidine

Felbamate

Felbinac

Fenfluramine

Fenoprofen

Fentanyl

Fepradinol

Feprazone

Fingolimod

Flecainide

Floctafenine

Fluconazole

Flufenamic Acid

Fluphenazine

Flurbiprofen

Fluvoxamine

Fondaparinux

Formoterol

Foscarnet

Fosphenytoin

Frovatriptan

Galantamine

Gatifloxacin

Gemifloxacin

Gonadorelin

Goserelin

Granisetron

Halofantrine

Haloperidol

Halothane

Heparin

Histrelin

Hydroquinidine

Hydroxychloroquine

Hydroxytryptophan

Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen Lysine

Ibutilide

Iloperidone

Imipramine

Indomethacin

Iobenguane I 123

Isoflurane

Isradipine

Itraconazole

Ivabradine

Ketoconazole

Ketoprofen

Ketorolac

Lapatinib

Lepirudin

Leuprolide

Levofloxacin

Levomilnacipran

Lidoflazine

Lofepramine

Lorcaserin

Lornoxicam

Loxoprofen

Lumefantrine

Lumiracoxib

Meclofenamate

Mefenamic Acid

Mefloquine

Melitracen

Meloxicam

Meperidine

Methadone

Metronidazole

Mexiletine

Mifepristone

Milnacipran

Mirtazapine

Mizolastine

Morniflumate

Moxifloxacin

Nabumetone

Nadroparin

Nafarelin

Naproxen

Naratriptan

Nefazodone

Nepafenac

Niflumic Acid

Nilotinib

Nimesulide

Norfloxacin

Nortriptyline

Octreotide

Olanzapine

Ondansetron

Opipramol

Oxaprozin

Oxyphenbutazone

Paliperidone

Palonosetron

Panobinostat

Parecoxib

Parnaparin

Paroxetine

Pasireotide

Pazopanib

Pentamidine

Pentazocine

Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium

Perflutren Lipid Microsphere

Perphenazine

Phenindione

Phenprocoumon

Phenylbutazone

Piketoprofen

Pirmenol

Piroxicam

Posaconazole

Prajmaline

Prasugrel

Probucol

Procainamide

Prochlorperazine

Proglumetacin

Promethazine

Propafenone

Propionic Acid

Propranolol

Propyphenazone

Proquazone

Protein C

Protriptyline

Quetiapine

Quinine

Ranolazine

Reviparin

Rilpivirine

Risperidone

Ritonavir

Rivaroxaban

Rizatriptan

Rofecoxib

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Salsalate

Sematilide

Sertindole

Sertraline

Sevoflurane

Sibutramine

Sodium Phosphate

Sodium Phosphate, Dibasic

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Solifenacin

Sorafenib

Sotalol

Spiramycin

St John's Wort

Sulfamethoxazole

Sulfinpyrazone

Sulindac

Sultopride

Sumatriptan

Sunitinib

Tacrolimus

Tamoxifen

Tapentadol

Tedisamil

Telavancin

Telithromycin

Tenoxicam

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Toremifene

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Treprostinil

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Using fluoxetine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of fluoxetine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bipolar disorder (mood disorder with mania and depression), or risk of or

Bleeding problems or

Diabetes or

Glaucoma (angle-closure type) or

Hyponatremia (low sodium in the blood) or

Mania, history of or

Seizures, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.

Heart attack or stroke, recent or history of or

Heart failure or

Heart rhythm problems (eg, QT prolongation), or history of or

Hypokalemia (low potassium in the blood) or

Hypomagnesemia (low magnesium in the blood)—May cause side effects to become worse.

Liver disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Proper Use of fluoxetine

Take fluoxetine only as directed by your doctor . to benefit your condition as much as possible. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

fluoxetine should come with a Medication Guide. It is very important that you read and understand this information. Be sure to ask your doctor about anything you do not understand.

You may take the medicine with or without food.

For some conditions, it may take a month or longer before you begin to feel better.

If you are using the oral liquid . shake the bottle well before measuring each dose. Measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. A regular household teaspoon will not measure the proper amount of medicine.

Dosing

The dose of fluoxetine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of fluoxetine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For oral dosage forms (delayed-release capsules, pulvules, or solution):

For bulimia nervosa:

Adults—60 milligrams (mg) per day as a single dose in the morning.

Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For depression:

Adults—At first, 20 milligrams (mg) per day as a single dose in the morning. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 80 mg per day. After a few weeks, your doctor may change you to a weekly dose of 90 mg, taken as a single dose one day per week.

Children 8 years of age and older—At first, 10 to 20 mg per day as a single dose in the morning. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed.

Children younger than 8 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For obsessive-compulsive disorder:

Adults—At first, 20 milligrams (mg) per day as a single dose in the morning. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 80 mg per day.

Children 7 years of age and older—At first, 10 mg per day as a single dose in the morning. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 60 mg per day.

Children younger than 7 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For panic disorder:

Adults—At first, 10 milligrams (mg) per day as a single dose in the morning. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 60 mg per day.

Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For premenstrual dysphoric disorder:

Adults—At first, 20 milligrams (mg) per day as a single dose in the morning. Your doctor may have you take 20 mg every day of your menstrual cycle or for only 15 days of your cycle. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 80 mg per day.

Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of fluoxetine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Precautions While Using fluoxetine

It is important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits . to allow changes in your dose and help reduce any side effects. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Do not take fluoxetine with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor (eg, isocarboxazid [Marplan®], linezolid [Zyvox®], methylene blue injection, phenelzine [Nardil®], selegiline [Eldepryl®], tranylcypromine [Parnate®]). Do not start taking fluoxetine during the 2 weeks after you stop a MAO inhibitor and wait 5 weeks after stopping fluoxetine before you start taking a MAO inhibitor. If you take them together or do not wait the proper amount of time, you may develop confusion, agitation, restlessness, stomach or intestinal symptoms, a sudden high body temperature, an extremely high blood pressure, or severe convulsions.

Do not take thioridazine (Mellaril®) with fluoxetine and wait 5 weeks after stopping fluoxetine before you start taking thioridazine. Do not use pimozide (Orap®) with fluoxetine. Using these medicines together can cause very serious heart problems.

Fluoxetine may cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome if taken together with some medicines. Do not use fluoxetine with buspirone (Buspar®), fentanyl (Abstral®, Duragesic®), lithium (Eskalith®, Lithobid®), tryptophan, St. John's wort, or some pain or migraine medicines (eg, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, tramadol, Frova®, Imitrex®, Maxalt®, Relpax®, Ultram®, Zomig®). Check with your doctor first before taking any other medicines with fluoxetine .

Fluoxetine may cause some teenagers and young adults to be agitated, irritable, or display other abnormal behaviors. It may also cause some people to have suicidal thoughts and tendencies or to become more depressed. Some people may have trouble sleeping, get upset easily, have a big increase in energy, or start to act reckless. If you or your caregiver notice any of these unwanted effects, tell your doctor right away. Let the doctor know if you or anyone in your family has bipolar disorder (manic-depressive) or has tried to commit suicide.

Do not suddenly stop taking fluoxetine without checking first with your doctor . Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are using before stopping it completely. This will decrease the chance of having withdrawal symptoms such as agitation, breathing problems, chest pain, confusion, diarrhea, dizziness or lightheadedness, fast heartbeat, headache, increased sweating, muscle pain, nausea, restlessness, runny nose, trouble in sleeping, trembling or shaking, unusual tiredness or weakness, vision changes, or vomiting.

Tell your doctor right away if you develop a rash or hives, swelling of the face, eyes, or mouth, or trouble breathing after taking fluoxetine.

fluoxetine may increase your risk for bleeding problems. Make sure your doctor knows if you are also taking other medicines that thin the blood, such as aspirin, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents, also called NSAIDs (eg, diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen, Advil®, Aleve®, Celebrex®, Voltaren®), or warfarin (Coumadin®, Jantoven®).

Hyponatremia (low sodium in the blood) may occur with fluoxetine. Check with your doctor right away if you have confusion, difficulty concentrating, headaches, memory problems, weakness, and unsteadiness.

Contact your doctor right away if you have dizziness, fainting, or a fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeat. Make sure your doctor knows if you have ever had a heart rhythm problem, such as QT prolongation, or if you or a family member has had a heart attack, heart failure, low blood pressure, or a stroke.

The use of alcohol is not recommended in patients who are taking fluoxetine.

For diabetic patients:

fluoxetine may affect blood sugar levels. If you are diabetic and notice a change in the results of your blood or urine sugar tests, check with your doctor.

fluoxetine may cause some people to become drowsy or less able to think clearly, or to have poor muscle control. Make sure you know how you react to fluoxetine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert and well able to control your movements .

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

fluoxetine Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common

Hives, itching, or skin rash

inability to sit still

restlessness

Less common

Chills or fever

joint or muscle pain

Rare

Anxiety

cold sweats

confusion

convulsions (seizures)

cool pale skin

diarrhea

difficulty with concentration

drowsiness

dryness of the mouth

excessive hunger

fast or irregular heartbeat

headache

increased sweating

increased thirst

lack of energy

mood or behavior changes

overactive reflexes

purple or red spots on the skin

racing heartbeat

shakiness or unsteady walk

shivering or shaking

talking, feeling, and acting with excitement and activity you cannot control

trouble with breathing

unusual or incomplete body or facial movements

unusual tiredness or weakness

Incidence not known

Abdominal or stomach pain

agitation

back or leg pains

bleeding gums

blindness

blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin

bloating

blood in the urine or stools

bloody, black or tarry stools

blue-yellow color blindness

blurred vision

chest pain or discomfort

clay-colored stools

constipation

continuing vomiting

cough or dry cough

dark urine

decreased urine output

decreased vision

depression

difficulty with breathing

difficulty with swallowing

dizziness or lightheadedness

eye pain

fainting

fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse

general body swelling

high fever

hives, itching, puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue

hostility

indigestion

irregular or slow heart rate

irritability

large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs

light-colored stools

loss of appetite

loss of bladder control

muscle twitching

nausea

nightmares

no blood pressure or pulse

noisy breathing

nosebleeds

pain in the ankles or knees

painful, red lumps under the skin, mostly on the legs

pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back

pinpoint red spots on the skin

rapid weight gain

red or irritated eyes

red skin lesions, often with a purple center

redness, tenderness, itching, burning, or peeling of the skin

severe muscle stiffness

severe sleepiness

slurred speech

sore throat

sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth

stopping of heart

sudden shortness of breath or troubled breathing

sudden weakness in the arms or legs

sudden, severe chest pain

swelling of the face, ankles, or hands

swollen or painful glands

thoughts of killing oneself

tightness in the chest

tiredness

twitching, twisting, or uncontrolled repetitive movements of the tongue, lips, face, arms, or legs

unconsciousness

unpleasant breath odor

unusual bleeding or bruising

unusual drowsiness, dullness, tiredness, weakness, or feeling of sluggishness

unusually pale skin

use of extreme physical or emotional force

vomiting of blood

yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

Decreased appetite

Less common or rare

Abnormal dreams

breast enlargement or pain

change in sense of taste

changes in vision

feeling of warmth or heat

flushing or redness of the skin, especially on face and neck

frequent urination

hair loss

increased appetite

increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight

menstrual pain

stomach cramps, gas, or pain

unusual secretion of milk, in females

weight loss

yawning

Incidence not known

Cracks in the skin

loss of heat from the body

painful or prolonged erections of the penis

scaly skin

swelling of the breasts or breast soreness in both females and males

unusual milk production

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Truven Health Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs. com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Truven Health products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Truven Health and Drugs. com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, TRUVEN HEALTH MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Truven Health does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Truven Health products.

Copyright 2016 Truven Health Analytics, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Floras Lake House B&B Rooms & Rates, Florak

Floras Lake House Bed & Breakfast

Traveler's Reviews

Rooms & Rates 2016*

Our season ends October 2, 2016*

Rates are per night for two & includes a full buffet-style breakfast. Children 12+ welcome. We have a 1.8% state lodging tax. Additional persons in North (4 max), Garden (3 max) or South Rooms (3 max) are $15 ea. We are a smoke free B&B.

Regular season rates $160 - $180. April to Memorial Weekend

High season rates $175 - $195. Memorial Weekend through end of September

Please click on a room below for rate information and more photos

* Scroll down below photos for further information *

North Room

Nautical Room

Garden Room

South Room

All rooms have private baths with showers (no tubs) and new granite counter tops. All 4 rooms enjoy views of the lake and the ocean

the lake sits between the B&B and the beach - approximately 1/4 mile away. Each room also has a second private deck entrance.

There are two rooms on either side of our spacious living room. The South and Garden Rooms are adjacent to each other down one hallway and the Nautical and North Rooms next to each other down the other. While all rooms face the lake and the ocean, the North and South Rooms have superior (larger) views. If you would like to spend time relaxing out on the deck, the South Room offers and bit more privacy, as the common deck wraps around the south end of the house.

*Please be aware there are no TVs in the rooms or common room.*

Wireless Internet: There is free, unlimited Wifi throughout the house and all rooms have iHome/iPod players.

Stairs & Access: All rooms are on the second floor - but because the B&B sits against a hill, the main access is up only 3-4 steps. Inside, the Nautical and North are down a hallway with no steps and the Garden and South are down a hallway up 3 steps.

Drinking Water: Some guests wonder about our tap water. Because we are on a ground water well system, our water is filtered, tested quarterly and is very good!

Check-in is 3 to 6pm. After 6pm by prior arrangement. Check-out is 12 Noon.

Please see our Policies page for more information.

Athletics At Archbishop Mcnicholas, Staderm

Archbishop McNicholas High School promotes a Christ-centered, Catholic community that embraces each student spiritually, intellectually, morally, and physically. We provide a safe, nurturing, creative, and challenging campus where individuals will grow in knowledge and faith. We equip our students with opportunities and experiences that will enable them to achieve excellence, live out gospel values, and attain full stature in Christ.

Campus Ministry at Archbishop McNicholas High School invites all students, faculty, and staff to become actively involved in helping to bring alive the Spirit of Christ in our community. At McNicholas, we do this through experiences and opportunities in three main areas of ministry: liturgical and sacramental life, faith building and retreats, and by serving God through serving others.

McNicholas High School helps students of all abilities to achieve excellence. Our personalized registration and class selection process allows students and parents to select course levels appropriate to a student’s ability in each subject area.

The Guidance Department provides support and services for students during their time at McNicholas as well as helps them prepare for their future.

Students at McNicholas develop their interests and talents outside of the classroom through a variety of activities and events. From the excitement of musicals to the intensity of Academic Team meets, from the activism of the Ecology Club to the leadership of the Student Council, from the pride of Homecoming to the glamour of prom, our students take part in a wide range of activities that make them feel at home.

Archbishop McNicholas High School is a place for students to find inspiration for the mind, heart and spirit. We place an emphasis on faith and service, have an average class size of 18, and offer college-preparatory curriculum designed to help students succeed at varying pacing levels. Our graduates leave here transformed and well-prepared to succeed in life.

Archbishop McNicholas High School strives to foster the development of strong Christian values through our athletic programs which are highly respected and bring excitement and spirit to our campus. McNicholas is a member of the GCL Coed Division which continues to be recognized as one of the strongest leagues in the state of Ohio

A McNicholas graduate automatically becomes a member of the Alumni Association upon graduation. There is no membership fee or registration process. The Alumni Association exists to help you maintain ties with McNicholas and fellow graduates. All alumni are welcome to join their classmates at these gatherings.

The spirit of service, philanthropy, and togetherness guides the students, alumni, parents, past parents, faculty and staff of McNicholas High School. Your support and engagement will enrich not only the lives of students currently at McNick but also the rich sense of pride and oneness with our alumni.

Athletics

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Cellex-C

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Cellex-C Skin Firming Cream Plus firms your skin while reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. This cream improves your skin's elasticity and resilience, helping it look five to 10 years younger. You can fight fine lines, wrinkles, age spots, and sagging skin, helping your skin to have improved texture, tone, and radiance. This non-greasy, emollient-based formula is gentle enough for all skin types for both men and women. It delivers 20 times more active vitamin C than your body can absorb orally. With daily use, you will notice visibly healthier, younger-looking skin within eight to 12 weeks.

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Phenergan (Promethazine) Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses, Phergan

DRUG DESCRIPTION

Each rectal suppository contains 12.5 mg or 25 mg promethazine HCl with ascorbyl palmitate. colloidal silicon dioxide, white wax, hard fat, and glyceryl monostearate. Phenergan (Promethazine HCl) Suppositories, USP are for rectal administration only.

Promethazine HCl is a racemic compound; the empirical formula is C 17 H 20 N 2 S•HCl and its molecular weight is 320.88.

Promethazine HCl, a phenothiazine derivative, is designated chemically as 10H-Phenothiazine, 10- ethanamine, N, N α-trimethyl-, monohydrochloride, (±)- with the following structural formula:

Promethazine HCl occurs as a white to faint yellow, practically odorless, crystalline powder, which slowly oxidizes and turns blue on prolonged exposure to air. It is soluble in water and freely soluble in alcohol.

What are the possible side effects of oral promethazine (Pentazine, Phenergan)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using promethazine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

twitching, or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs;

tremor (uncontrolled shaking), drooling, trouble swallowing, problems with balance or walking;

feeling restless, jittery, or agitated;

high fever, stiff muscles, confusion, sweating.

What are the precautions when taking promethazine (Phenergan)?

See also Warning section.

Before taking promethazine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to any other phenothiazines (such as prochlorperazine); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: breathing problems (such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-COPD, sleep apnea), blood/immune system problems (such as bone marrow depression), high pressure in the eye (glaucoma), heart disease (such as irregular heartbeat), high blood pressure, liver disease, certain brain disorders (such as neuroleptic malignant.

Last reviewed on RxList: 9/6/2016 This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Buy Generic For Panafen 400mg, Panafen

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Generic Name: Ibuprofen

Generic for Panafen* (Ibuprofen) is used for the treatment of mild-to-moderate pain and inflammation caused by a variety of conditions such as arthritis, headache, back pain, menstrual cramps, and toothache. Generic for Panafen* belongs to a class of drugs called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This medicine works by reducing the pain-causing hormones in the body. This medicine may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor. Read More>>

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Facts about Generic Drugs

Generic drugs are chemically identical to brand-name drugs in terms of active ingredient(s), intended use, quality, dosage, safety, bioavailability and effectiveness.

Generic drugs are cheaper than brand-name drugs.

What is Generic for Panafen* used for?

Generic for Panafen* (Ibuprofen) is used for the treatment of mild-to-moderate pain and inflammation caused by a variety of conditions such as arthritis, headache, back pain, menstrual cramps, and toothache. Generic for Panafen* belongs to a class of drugs called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This medicine works by reducing the pain-causing hormones in the body. This medicine may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

What is the recommended dosage of Generic for Panafen*?

The dosage of Generic for Panafen* prescribed to each patient will vary. Always follow your physician’s instructions and/or the directions on the prescription drug label.

Take Generic for Panafen* with food or milk to lessen stomach upset.

What if you miss a dose of Generic for Panafen*?

If your physician has instructed or directed you to take Generic for Panafen* medication in a regular schedule and you have missed a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, then skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double the doses unless otherwise directed.

What if you overdose on Generic for Panafen*?

Any medication taken in excess can have serious consequences. If you suspect an overdose of Generic for Panafen*, seek medical attention immediately.

What other drugs could interact with Generic for Panafen*?

It may be noted that drugs other than those listed above may also interact with Generic for Panafen*

Usually drug interactions occur when it is taken with another drug or with food. Before you take a medication for a particular ailment, you should inform the health expert about intake of any other medications including non-prescription medications, over-the-counter medicines that may increase the effect of Generic for Panafen*, and dietary supplements like vitamins, minerals and herbal, so that the doctor can warn you of any possible drug interactions.

Generic for Panafen* can interact with diuretics and blood thinners.

Also, tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks containing caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines.

What are the side effects of Generic for Panafen*?

Like other medicines, Generic for Panafen* can cause some side effects. If they do occur, the side effects of Generic for Panafen* are most likely to be minor and temporary. However, some may be serious and may require the individual to inform the doctor or visit the nearest hospital immediately.

It is pertinent to note that side effects of Generic for Panafen* cannot be anticipated. If any side effects of Generic for Panafen* develop or change in intensity, the doctor should be informed as soon as possible.

Generic for Panafen* can cause side effects such as constipation, diarrhea, bloating, gas, mild heartburn, dizziness, headache, and blurred vision. This is not a complete list of all side effects. Do concur with your doctor and follow his directions completely when you are taking Generic for Panafen*

What are the questions to ask your doctor before taking Generic for Panafen*?

Is it possible for me to take Generic for Panafen* with other drugs? Should certain beverages, foods and other products be avoided when I take Generic for Panafen*? What are the possible drug interactions of Generic for Panafen*? How will Generic for Panafen* work in my body? How should Generic for Panafen* be taken? How to reduce the risk of Generic for Panafen* drug interactions and side effects?

Note

The health and medical information provided here is intended to supplement and not substitute for the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacists or other health care professional. It should not be understood to indicate that the use of Generic for Panafen* is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Always consult your health care professional before using this, or any other, drug.

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Important Notice: The Drugs. com international database is in BETA release. This means it is still under development and may contain inaccuracies. It is not intended as a substitute for the expertise and judgement of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that the use of any medication in any country is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Consult with your healthcare professional before taking any medication.

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Click for further information on drug naming conventions and International Nonproprietary Names .

Important Notice: The Drugs. com international database is in BETA release. This means it is still under development and may contain inaccuracies. It is not intended as a substitute for the expertise and judgement of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that the use of any medication in any country is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Consult with your healthcare professional before taking any medication.

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Creating Communities

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2016 Hysan Development Co. Ltd. Interim Results Analyst Briefing Live Webcast

Date: 2 August 2016 (Tuesday) Starting time: 5pm

Due to Typhoon NIDA, we will have the following special arrangement: If Typhoon Signal No.8 or above and/or the Black Rainstorm Warning signal is still in place at 12:00 (noon) on 2 August, the webcast will be re-scheduled to the next business day (3 August) and will remain at 5:00pm. Otherwise, the webcast will start at 5:00 pm on 2 August, 2016.

Please click here for registration and log in.

©2014 Hysan. All Rights Reserved.

Buy Losagen - Losartan - Online Without Prescriptions, Losagen

Cozaar (Losagen)

Cozaar is used for treating high blood pressure alone or with other medicines. It is used in certain patients to decrease the risk of stroke. It is used in certain patients to treat kidney problems caused by diabetes (diabetic nephropathy). Cozaar is an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). It works by relaxing blood vessels. This helps to lower blood pressure.

Use Cozaar as directed by your doctor.

Take Cozaar by mouth with or without food.

Take Cozaar on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. Taking Cozaar at the same time each day will help you remember to take it.

Continue to take Cozaar even if you feel well. Do not miss any dose.

If you miss a dose of Cozaar, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Cozaar.

Store Cozaar at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Cozaar out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Losartan potassium.

Do NOT use Cozaar if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Cozaar

you are in your second or third trimester of pregnancy

the patient is a child with severe kidney problems.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Cozaar. Tell your health care provider if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you are able to become pregnant

if you have a history of angioedema (swelling of the hands, face, lips, eyes, throat, or tongue; difficulty swallowing or breathing; or hoarseness), including angioedema caused by treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (eg, lisinopril)

if you have a history of heart problems (eg, heart failure), blood vessel problems, blood flow problems, liver or kidney problems, or diabetes

if you have a history of stroke or recent heart attack

if you are dehydrated or have low blood volume

if you have electrolyte problems (eg, high blood potassium levels, low blood sodium levels) or are on a low-salt (sodium) diet

if you are on dialysis or are scheduled to have major surgery.

Some medicines may interact with Cozaar. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because the risk of low blood pressure may be increased

Potassium-sparing diuretics (eg, spironolactone, triamterene) or potassium supplements because the risk of high blood potassium levels may be increased

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen, indomethacin, celecoxib) or rifampin because they may decrease Cozaar's effectiveness

Lithium because the risk of its side effects may be increased by Cozaar.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Cozaar may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Cozaar may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Cozaar with caution. Do not drive or perform other possible unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Cozaar may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting; alcohol, hot weather, exercise, or fever may increase these effects. To prevent them, sit up or stand slowly, especially in the morning. Sit or lie down at the first sign of any of these effects.

Cozaar may cause a serious side effect called angioedema. Contact your doctor at once if you develop swelling of the hands, face, lips, eyes throat, or tongue; difficulty swallowing or breathing; or hoarseness.

Cozaar may not work as well to reduce the risk of stroke in black patients. Discuss any questions or concerns with your doctor.

Dehydration, excessive sweating, vomiting, or diarrhea may increase the risk of low blood pressure. Contact your health care provider at once if any of these occur.

Check with your doctor before you use a salt substitute or a product that has potassium in it.

Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Cozaar before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.

Patients who take medicine for high blood pressure often feel tired or run down for a few weeks after starting treatment. Be sure to take your medicine even if you may not feel "normal." Tell your doctor if you develop any new symptoms.

If you have high blood pressure, do not use nonprescription products that contain stimulants. These products may include diet pills or cold medicines. Contact your doctor if you have any questions or concerns.

Diabetes patients - This may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Lab tests, including blood pressure, blood electrolyte levels, and heart, kidney, or liver function, may be performed while you use Cozaar. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Cozaar should not be used in children younger 6 years; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Cozaar may cause birth defects or fetal death if you take it while you are pregnant. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor right away. It is not known if Cozaar is found in breast milk. Do not breastfeed while taking Cozaar.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; dizziness; tiredness.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; hoarseness); change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain; dark urine; difficulty swallowing; fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat; muscle pain or cramps; severe or persistent stomach pain (with or without nausea or vomiting); symptoms of low blood pressure (eg, fainting, severe dizziness, lightheadedness); unusual bruising or bleeding; vision changes; yellowing of the eyes or skin.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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The USP Dictionary of United States Adopted Names (USAN) and International Drug Names is the leading reference for nonproprietary drug names and chemical structures. In addition to USANs, the USP Dictionary provides International Nonproprietary Names (INNs), British Approved Names, Japanese Accepted Names, brand names, Unique Ingredient Identifier (UNII) codes, manufacturers, official USP–NF names, molecular weights, graphic formulas, pharmacologic and/or therapeutic categories, and pronunciations.

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Verify names and spellings of materials used in laboratory research

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Depakene Indications, Side Effects, Warnings, Depalept

Depakene

Generic Name: valproic acid (val-PROE-ik AS-id) Brand Name: Depakene

Liver failure and death from liver failure has occurred in patients taking Depakene. This has usually occurred within the first 6 months of treatment. Tell your doctor right away if you notice symptoms of liver problems (eg, a general feeling of discomfort, sluggishness, unusual tiredness or weakness, swelling of the face, loss of appetite, vomiting, stomach pain, dark urine, pale stools, yellowing of the skin or eyes). In patients who have seizures, loss of seizure control may occur. You should have lab tests done before and during treatment to check for liver problems. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Children younger than 2 years old have an increased risk of fatal liver problems, especially if they take more than 1 seizure medicine or have a metabolic disorder, a severe seizure disorder along with mental retardation, or organic brain disease. Discuss any questions or concerns with your doctor.

There is an increased risk of liver failure and death from liver failure in patients who have a genetic liver problem caused by a mitochondrial disorder (eg, Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome). You may need to have a special genetic test to check for this condition. Certain patients who have known or suspected mitochondrial disorders should not take Depakene. Talk with your doctor for more information.

Depakene can cause severe birth defects if it is used during pregnancy. It can also cause the child to have a lower IQ. Do not take Depakene to prevent migraine headaches if you are pregnant. If you are pregnant and take Depakene for seizures or bipolar disorder, talk to your doctor to decide if you will continue to take Depakene.

If you are able to become pregnant, you must use an effective form of birth control while you take Depakene. Contact your doctor right away if you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant while taking Depakene.

Depakene comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Depakene refilled.

Severe and sometimes fatal pancreas problems (pancreatitis) have occurred with the use of Depakene. This has been reported shortly after starting treatment as well as after several years of use. Seek immediate medical attention if you notice any stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite.

Depakene is used for:

Treating certain seizure disorders. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Depakene is an anticonvulsant. It works by increasing the amount of a certain chemical in the brain.

Do NOT use Depakene if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Depakene

you have liver problems or a urea cycle disorder

you have a genetic liver problem caused by a mitochondrial disorder (eg, Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome)

the patient is younger than 2 years old and has a mitochondrial disorder

you are taking Depakene to prevent migraine headaches and you are pregnant

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Depakene:

Some medical conditions may interact with Depakene. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, are breast-feeding, or are of childbearing age

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances (eg, peanuts)

if you have a history of liver problems, cancer, blood disease (eg, low levels of white blood cells, low blood platelet levels), HIV infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, kidney problems, pancreas problems, low blood albumin levels, or high blood glycine levels

if you have a history of metabolic problems, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, brain problems (eg, organic brain disease), coma, high blood ammonia or glutamine levels, low body temperature, mental retardation, recurring vomiting and sluggishness, or recurring extreme irritability

if you have a history of mental or mood problems, suicidal thoughts or actions, or alcohol abuse or dependence

if you have decreased food or fluid intake, or if you are scheduled for surgery

if you have a family history of urea cycle disorders or unexplained infant deaths

if you take any other medicine for seizures

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Depakene. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Clonazepam because the risk of seizures may be increased in certain patients

Topiramate because the risk of high ammonium levels and brain problems may be increased

Benzodiazepines (eg, diazepam), felbamate, or salicylates (eg, aspirin) because they may increase the risk of Depakene's side effects

Carbamazepine, carbapenem antibiotics (eg, imipenem), hormonal birth control (eg, birth control pills), hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), mefloquine, rifampin, or ritonavir because they may decrease Depakene's effectiveness

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital, primidone), ethosuximide, lamotrigine, methylphenidate, quetiapine, rufinamide, tolbutamide, tricyclic antidepressants (eg, amitriptyline), or zidovudine because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Depakene

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Depakene may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Depakene:

Use Depakene as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Depakene comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Depakene refilled.

Take Depakene by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation.

Swallow Depakene whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing.

Depakene works best if it is taken at the same time each day.

Continue to take Depakene even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses.

Do not suddenly stop taking Depakene; this may cause an increased risk of severe seizures. If you need to stop Depakene or add a new medicine, your doctor will gradually lower your dose.

If you miss a dose of Depakene, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Depakene.

Important safety information:

Depakene may cause dizziness, drowsiness, or vision changes. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Depakene with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Check with your doctor before you drink alcohol or use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Depakene; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness.

Patients who take Depakene may be at increased risk for suicidal thoughts or actions. The risk may be greater in patients who have bipolar (manic-depressive) illness and in those who have had suicidal thoughts or actions in the past. Watch patients who take Depakene closely. Contact the doctor at once if new, worsened, or sudden symptoms such as depressed mood; anxious, restless, or irritable behavior; panic attacks; or any unusual change in mood or behavior occur. Contact the doctor right away if any signs of suicidal thoughts or actions occur.

Inflammation of the pancreas is a potentially life-threatening illness associated with Depakene. Symptoms include stomach pain, vomiting, or loss of appetite. Contact your doctor at once if any of these symptoms occur.

A very bad and sometimes deadly reaction has happened with this drug. Most of the time, this reaction has signs like fever, rash, or swollen glands with problems in body organs like the liver, kidney, blood, heart, muscles and joints, or lungs. Talk with the doctor.

Depakene may reduce the number of clot-forming cells (platelets) in your blood. Avoid activities that may cause bruising or injury. Tell your doctor if you have unusual bruising or bleeding. Tell your doctor if you have dark, tarry, or bloody stools.

You may notice undissolved parts of Depakene in your stool with some brands of Depakene. Contact your doctor if this occurs.

Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Depakene before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.

Some brands of Depakene contain peanut oil. If you are allergic to peanuts, ask your pharmacist if your brand contains peanut oil.

Certain brain problems have happened with the use of valproic acid products. Sometimes, these problems have led to health problems that may not go away. Discuss any questions or concerns with your doctor.

Diabetes patients - Depakene may cause the results of some tests for urine ketones to be wrong. Ask your doctor before you change your diet or the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Depakene may interfere with certain lab tests, including thyroid function. Be sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are taking Depakene.

Lab tests, including complete blood cell counts and liver function, may be performed while you use Depakene. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Depakene with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially drowsiness.

Depakene has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. If you may become pregnant, discuss other possible treatment options with your doctor. If a decision is made to take Depakene, use effective birth control while you are taking it. Talk with your doctor if you are planning to become pregnant, or if you have questions or concerns about this information.

PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Depakene has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor right away. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Depakene while you are pregnant. You and your doctor will need to decide if you will continue to take Depakene while you are pregnant. Depakene is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while you are taking Depakene.

Possible side effects of Depakene:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; headache; increased or decreased appetite; mild hair loss; nausea; sore throat; stomach pain or upset; trouble sleeping; vomiting; weakness; weight gain.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing or swallowing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, throat, or tongue); abnormal thinking; behavior changes; blurred vision or other vision changes; change in menstrual period; change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain; confusion; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; general feeling of being unwell; hallucinations; hearing loss; joint or muscle pain or weakness; loss of coordination; memory loss; new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, aggressiveness, agitation, anxiety, depression, exaggerated feeling of well-being, hostility, impulsiveness, inability to sit still, irritability, panic attacks, restlessness); new or worsening seizures; red, swollen, peeling, or blistered skin; ringing in the ears; severe or persistent nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite; severe or persistent stomach pain or cramps; shortness of breath; sluggishness; suicidal thoughts or actions; swelling of the arms or legs; swollen lymph nodes; symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, loss of appetite, pale stools, severe stomach pain, yellowing of the skin or eyes); tremor; trouble speaking or walking; uncontrolled muscle movements; unusual bleeding or bruising; unusual tiredness or weakness.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA .

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center. or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Depakene:

Store Depakene between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Depakene out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information:

If you have any questions about Depakene, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Depakene is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people.

If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take Depakene or any other medicine. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for you. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about Depakene. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to Depakene. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. You must talk with your health care provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using Depakene.

Review Date: August 8, 2016

Disclaimer: This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for you. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. You must talk with your healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

More about Depakene (valproic acid)

What Does Polymox Mean Definition And Meaning (Free English Language Dictionary), Polymox

POLYMOX

An antibiotic; a semisynthetic oral penicillin (trade names Amoxil and Larotid and Polymox and Trimox and Augmentin) used to treat bacterial infections

Nouns denoting man-made objects

Hypernyms ("Polymox" is a kind of. ):

penicillin (any of various antibiotics obtained from Penicillium molds (or produced synthetically) and used in the treatment of various infections and diseases)

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"Blood is thicker than water." (English proverb)

"Patience is bitter, but it has a sweet fruit." (Afghanistan proverb)

"If you are saved from the lion, do not be greedy and hunt it." (Arabic proverb)

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Motrin - Pain Relief, Dolonet

Motrin is used for treating rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, menstrual cramps, or mild to moderate pain. Motrin is an NSAID. NSAIDs treat the symptoms of pain and inflammation. They do not treat the disease that causes those symptoms.

Use Motrin as directed by your doctor.

Take Motrin by mouth with or without food. It may be taken with food if it upsets your stomach. Taking it with food may not lower the risk of stomach or bowel problems (eg, bleeding, ulcers). Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you have persistent stomach upset.

Take Motrin with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL) as directed by your doctor.

If you miss a dose of Motrin and you are taking it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose. Go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about the proper use of Motrin .

Store Motrin at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Motrin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Ibuprofen.

Do NOT use Motrin if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Motrin

you have had a severe allergic reaction (eg, severe rash, hives, trouble breathing, growths in the nose, dizziness) to aspirin or an NSAID (eg, ibuprofen, celecoxib)

you have recently had or will be having bypass heart surgery

you are in the last 3 months of pregnancy.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Motrin. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal product, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have a history of kidney or liver disease, diabetes, or stomach or bowel problems (eg, bleeding, perforation, ulcers)

if you have a history of swelling or fluid buildup, lupus, asthma, or growths in the nose (nasal polyps), or mouth inflammation

if you have high blood pressure, blood disorders, bleeding or clotting problems, heart problems (eg, heart failure), or blood vessel disease, or if you are at risk for any of these diseases

if you have poor health, dehydration or low fluid volume, or low blood sodium levels, you drink alcohol, or you have a history of alcohol abuse.

Some medicines may interact with Motrin. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), aspirin, corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), heparin, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (eg, fluoxetine) because the risk of stomach bleeding may be increased

Probenecid because it may increase the risk of Motrin 's side effects

Cyclosporine, lithium, methotrexate, or quinolones (eg, ciprofloxacin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Motrin

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril) or diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Motrin.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Motrin may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Motrin may cause dizziness or drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Motrin with caution. Do not drive or perform other possible unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.

Serious stomach ulcers or bleeding can occur with the use of Motrin. Taking it in high doses or for a long time, smoking, or drinking alcohol increases the risk of these side effects. Taking Motrin with food will NOT reduce the risk of these effects. Contact your doctor or emergency room at once if you develop severe stomach or back pain; black, tarry stools; vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds; or unusual weight gain or swelling.

Do not take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor.

Motrin has ibuprofen in it. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has ibuprofen in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist.

Do not take aspirin while you are using Motrin unless your doctor tells you to.

Lab tests, including kidney function, complete blood cell counts, and blood pressure, may be done to monitor your progress or to check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Motrin with caution in the elderly; they may be more sensitive to its effects, including stomach bleeding and kidney problems.

Motrin should be used with extreme caution in children; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Motrin may cause harm to the fetus. Do not take it during the last 3 months of pregnancy. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of taking Motrin while you are pregnant. It is not known if Motrin is found in breast milk. Do not breastfeed while taking Motrin .

All medicines can cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; gas; headache; heartburn; nausea; stomach pain or upset.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; trouble breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); bloody or black, tarry stools; change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain; confusion; dark urine; depression; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; mental or mood changes; numbness of an arm or leg; one-sided weakness; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; ringing in the ears; seizures; severe headache or dizziness; severe or persistent stomach pain or nausea; severe vomiting; shortness of breath; stiff neck; sudden or unexplained weight gain; swelling of hands, legs, or feet; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual joint or muscle pain; unusual tiredness or weakness; vision or speech changes; vomit that looks like coffee grounds; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

Ranexa - Fda Prescribing Information, Side Effects And Uses, Ranixal

Ranexa

Ranexa ® is indicated for the treatment of chronic angina.

Ranexa may be used with beta-blockers, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, anti-platelet therapy, lipid-lowering therapy, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers.

Ranexa Dosage and Administration

Dosing Information

Initiate Ranexa dosing at 500 mg twice daily and increase to 1000 mg twice daily, as needed, based on clinical symptoms. Take Ranexa with or without meals. Swallow Ranexa tablets whole; do not crush, break, or chew.

The maximum recommended daily dose of Ranexa is 1000 mg twice daily.

If a dose of Ranexa is missed, take the prescribed dose at the next scheduled time; do not double the next dose.

Dose Modification

Dose adjustments may be needed when Ranexa is taken in combination with certain other drugs [see Drug Interactions (7.1) ]. Limit the maximum dose of Ranexa to 500 mg twice daily in patients on moderate CYP3A inhibitors such as diltiazem, verapamil, and erythromycin. Use of Ranexa with strong CYP3A inhibitors is contraindicated [see Contraindications (4). Drug Interactions (7.1) ]. Use of P-gp inhibitors, such as cyclosporine, may increase exposure to Ranexa. Titrate Ranexa based on clinical response [see Drug Interactions (7.1) ].

Dosage Forms and Strengths

Ranexa is supplied as film-coated, oblong-shaped, extended-release tablets in the following strengths:

500 mg tablets are light orange, with GSI500 on one side

1000 mg tablets are pale yellow, with GSI1000 on one side

Contraindications

Ranexa is contraindicated in patients:

Warnings and Precautions

QT Interval Prolongation

Ranolazine blocks I Kr and prolongs the QTc interval in a dose-related manner.

Clinical experience in an acute coronary syndrome population did not show an increased risk of proarrhythmia or sudden death [see Clinical Studies (14.2) ]. However, there is little experience with high doses (> 1000 mg twice daily) or exposure, other QT-prolonging drugs, potassium channel variants resulting in a long QT interval, in patients with a family history of (or congenital) long QT syndrome, or in patients with known acquired QT interval prolongation.

Renal Failure

Acute renal failure has been observed in some patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance [CrCL] < 30 mL/min) while taking Ranexa. If acute renal failure develops (e. g. marked increase in serum creatinine associated with an increase in blood urea nitrogen [BUN]), discontinue Ranexa and treat appropriately [see Use in Specific Populations (8.7) ] .

Monitor renal function after initiation and periodically in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment (CrCL < 60 mL/min) for increases in serum creatinine accompanied by an increase in BUN.

Adverse Reactions

Clinical Trial Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

A total of 2018 patients with chronic angina were treated with ranolazine in controlled clinical trials. Of the patients treated with Ranexa, 1026 were enrolled in three double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized studies (CARISA, ERICA, MARISA) of up to 12 weeks' duration. In addition, upon study completion, 1251 patients received treatment with Ranexa in open-label, long-term studies; 1227 patients were exposed to Ranexa for more than 1 year, 613 patients for more than 2 years, 531 patients for more than 3 years, and 326 patients for more than 4 years.

At recommended doses, about 6% of patients discontinued treatment with Ranexa because of an adverse event in controlled studies in angina patients compared to about 3% on placebo. The most common adverse events that led to discontinuation more frequently on Ranexa than placebo were dizziness (1.3% versus 0.1%), nausea (1% versus 0%), asthenia, constipation, and headache (each about 0.5% versus 0%). Doses above 1000 mg twice daily are poorly tolerated.

In controlled clinical trials of angina patients, the most frequently reported treatment-emergent adverse reactions (> 4% and more common on Ranexa than on placebo) were dizziness (6.2%), headache (5.5%), constipation (4.5%), and nausea (4.4%). Dizziness may be dose-related. In open-label, long-term treatment studies, a similar adverse reaction profile was observed.

The following additional adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of 0.5 to 4.0% in patients treated with Ranexa and were more frequent than the incidence observed in placebo-treated patients:

Cardiac Disorders – bradycardia, palpitations

Ear and Labyrinth Disorders – tinnitus, vertigo

Eye Disorders – blurred vision

Gastrointestinal Disorders – abdominal pain, dry mouth, vomiting, dyspepsia

General Disorders and Administrative Site Adverse Events – asthenia, peripheral edema

Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders – anorexia

Nervous System Disorders – syncope (vasovagal)

Psychiatric Disorders – confusional state

Renal and Urinary Disorders – hematuria

Respiratory. Thoracic, and Mediastinal Disorders – dyspnea

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders – hyperhidrosis

Vascular Disorders – hypotension, orthostatic hypotension

Other (< 0.5%) but potentially medically important adverse reactions observed more frequently with Ranexa than placebo treatment in all controlled studies included: angioedema, renal failure, eosinophilia, chromaturia, blood urea increased, hypoesthesia, paresthesia, tremor, pulmonary fibrosis, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, and pancytopenia.

A large clinical trial in acute coronary syndrome patients was unsuccessful in demonstrating a benefit for Ranexa, but there was no apparent proarrhythmic effect in these high-risk patients [see Clinical Studies (14.2) ] .

Ranexa produces elevations of serum creatinine by 0.1 mg/dL, regardless of previous renal function, likely because of inhibition of creatinine's tubular secretion. In general, the elevation has a rapid onset, shows no signs of progression during long-term therapy, is reversible after discontinuation of Ranexa, and is not accompanied by changes in BUN. In healthy volunteers, Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily had no effect upon the glomerular filtration rate. More marked and progressive increases in serum creatinine, associated with increases in BUN or potassium, indicating acute renal failure, have been reported after initiation of Ranexa in patients with severe renal impairment [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2). Use in Specific Populations (8.7) ] .

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of Ranexa. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure:

Nervous System Disorders – Tremor, paresthesia, abnormal coordination, and other serious neurologic adverse events have been reported to occur, sometimes concurrently, in patients taking ranolazine. The onset of events was often associated with an increase in ranolazine dose or exposure. Many patients reported symptom resolution following drug discontinuation or dose decrease.

Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders – Cases of hypoglycemia have been reported in diabetic patients on antidiabetic medication.

Psychiatric Disorders – hallucination

Renal and Urinary Disorders – dysuria, urinary retention

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders – angioedema, pruritus, rash

Drug Interactions

Effects of Other Drugs on Ranolazine

Strong CYP3A Inhibitors

Do not use Ranexa with strong CYP3A inhibitors, including ketoconazole, itraconazole, clarithromycin, nefazodone, nelfinavir, ritonavir, indinavir, and saquinavir [see Contraindications (4). Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ] .

Moderate CYP3A Inhibitors

Limit the dose of Ranexa to 500 mg twice daily in patients on moderate CYP3A inhibitors, including diltiazem, verapamil, erythromycin, fluconazole, and grapefruit juice or grapefruit-containing products [see Dosage and Administration (2.2). Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ].

Concomitant use of Ranexa and P-gp inhibitors, such as cyclosporine, may result in increases in ranolazine concentrations. Titrate Ranexa based on clinical response in patients concomitantly treated with predominant P-gp inhibitors such as cyclosporine [see Dosage and Administration (2.2) ].

Do not use Ranexa with CYP3A inducers such as rifampin, rifabutin, rifapentine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and St. John's wort [see Contraindications (4). Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ] .

Effects of Ranolazine on Other Drugs

Drugs Metabolized by CYP3A

Limit the dose of simvastatin in patients on any dose of Ranexa to 20 mg once daily, when ranolazine is co-administered. Dose adjustment of other sensitive CYP3A substrates (e. g. lovastatin) and CYP3A substrates with a narrow therapeutic range (e. g. cyclosporine, tacrolimus, sirolimus) may be required as Ranexa may increase plasma concentrations of these drugs [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ] .

Drugs Transported by P-gp

Concomitant use of ranolazine and digoxin results in increased exposure to digoxin. The dose of digoxin may have to be adjusted [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ].

Drugs Metabolized by CYP2D6

The exposure to CYP2D6 substrates, such as tricyclic antidepressants and antipsychotics, may be increased during co-administration with Ranexa, and lower doses of these drugs may be required.

Drugs Transported by OCT2

In subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus, concomitant use of Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily and metformin results in increased plasma levels of metformin. When Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily is co-administered with metformin, metformin dose should not exceed 1700 mg/day. Monitor blood glucose levels and risks associated with high exposures of metformin. Metformin exposure was not significantly increased when given with Ranexa 500 mg twice daily [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ].

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Pregnancy

There are no available data on Ranexa use in pregnant women to inform any drug-associated risks. Studies in rats and rabbits showed no evidence of fetal harm at exposures 4 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) (see Data ) .

In the U. S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and of miscarriage of clinically recognized pregnancies is 2–4% and 15–20%, respectively.

Embryofetal toxicity studies were conducted in rats and rabbits orally administered ranolazine during organogenesis. In rats, decreased fetal weight and reduced ossification were observed at doses (corresponding to 4-fold the AUC for the MRHD) that caused maternal weight loss. No adverse fetal effects were observed in either species exposed (AUC) to ranolazine at exposures (AUC) equal to the MRHD.

Lactation

There are no data on the presence of ranolazine in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. However, ranolazine is present in rat milk [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1) ]. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for Ranexa and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from Ranexa or from the underlying maternal condition.

Adult female rats were administered ranolazine orally from gestation day 6 through postnatal day 20. No adverse effects on pup development, behavior, or reproduction parameters were observed at a maternal dosage level of 60 mg/kg/day (equal to the MHRD based on AUC). At maternally toxic doses, male and female pups exhibited increased mortality and decreased body weight, and female pups showed increased motor activity. The pups were potentially exposed to low amounts of ranolazine via the maternal milk.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness have not been established in pediatric patients.

Geriatric Use

Of the chronic angina patients treated with Ranexa in controlled studies, 496 (48%) were ≥ 65 years of age, and 114 (11%) were ≥ 75 years of age. No overall differences in efficacy were observed between older and younger patients. There were no differences in safety for patients ≥ 65 years compared to younger patients, but patients ≥ 75 years of age on Ranexa, compared to placebo, had a higher incidence of adverse events, serious adverse events, and drug discontinuations due to adverse events. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should usually start at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease, or other drug therapy.

Use in Patients with Hepatic Impairment

Ranexa is contraindicated in patients with liver cirrhosis. In a study of cirrhotic patients, the C max of ranolazine was increased 30% in cirrhotic patients with mild (Child-Pugh Class A) hepatic impairment, but increased 80% in cirrhotic patients with moderate (Child-Pugh Class B) hepatic impairment compared to patients without hepatic impairment. This increase was not enough to account for the 3-fold increase in QT prolongation seen in cirrhotic patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2) ] .

Use in Patients with Renal Impairment

A pharmacokinetic study of Ranexa in subjects with severe renal impairment (CrCL < 30 mL/min) was stopped when 2 of 4 subjects developed acute renal failure after receiving Ranexa 500 mg twice daily for 5 days (lead-in phase) followed by 1000 mg twice a day (1 dose in one subject and 11 doses in the other). Increases in creatinine, BUN, and potassium were observed in 3 subjects during the 500 mg lead-in phase. One subject required hemodialysis, while the other 2 subjects improved upon drug discontinuation [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) ]. Monitor renal function periodically in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. Discontinue Ranexa if acute renal failure develops.

In a separate study, C max was increased between 40% and 50% in patients with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment compared to patients with no renal impairment, suggesting a similar increase in exposure in patients with renal failure independent of the degree of impairment. The pharmacokinetics of ranolazine has not been assessed in patients on dialysis.

Use in Patients with Heart Failure

Heart failure (NYHA Class I to IV) had no significant effect on ranolazine pharmacokinetics. Ranexa had minimal effects on heart rate and blood pressure in patients with angina and heart failure NYHA Class I to IV. No dose adjustment of Ranexa is required in patients with heart failure.

Use in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

A population pharmacokinetic evaluation of data from angina patients and healthy subjects showed no effect of diabetes on ranolazine pharmacokinetics. No dose adjustment is required in patients with diabetes.

Ranexa produces small reductions in HbA1c in patients with diabetes, the clinical significance of which is unknown. Ranexa should not be considered a treatment for diabetes.

Overdosage

High oral doses of ranolazine produce dose-related increases in dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. High intravenous exposure also produces diplopia, paresthesia, confusion, and syncope. In addition to general supportive measures, continuous ECG monitoring may be warranted in the event of overdose. Severe tremor, unsteady gait/incoordination, dysphasia, and hallucinations have been reported in cases of overdose with Ranexa.

Since ranolazine is about 62% bound to plasma proteins, hemodialysis is unlikely to be effective in clearing ranolazine.

Ranexa Description

Ranexa (ranolazine) is available as a film-coated, non-scored, extended-release tablet for oral administration.

Ranolazine is a racemic mixture, chemically described as 1-piperazineacetamide, N -(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-4-[2-hydroxy-3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)propyl]-, (±)-. It has an empirical formula of C 24 H 33 N 3 O 4. a molecular weight of 427.54 g/mole, and the following structural formula:

Ranolazine is a white to off-white solid. Ranolazine is soluble in dichloromethane and methanol; sparingly soluble in tetrahydrofuran, ethanol, acetonitrile, and acetone; slightly soluble in ethyl acetate, isopropanol, toluene, and ethyl ether; and very slightly soluble in water.

Ranexa tablets contain 500 mg or 1000 mg of ranolazine and the following inactive ingredients: carnauba wax, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer (Type C), microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, sodium hydroxide, and titanium dioxide. Additional inactive ingredients for the 500 mg tablet include polyvinyl alcohol, talc, Iron Oxide Yellow, and Iron Oxide Red; additional inactive ingredients for the 1000 mg tablet include lactose monohydrate, triacetin, and Iron Oxide Yellow.

Ranexa - Clinical Pharmacology

Mechanism of Action

The mechanism of action of ranolazine's antianginal effects has not been determined. Ranolazine has anti-ischemic and antianginal effects that do not depend upon reductions in heart rate or blood pressure. It does not affect the rate-pressure product, a measure of myocardial work, at maximal exercise. Ranolazine at therapeutic levels can inhibit the cardiac late sodium current (I Na ). However, the relationship of this inhibition to angina symptoms is uncertain.

The QT prolongation effect of ranolazine on the surface electrocardiogram is the result of inhibition of I Kr. which prolongs the ventricular action potential.

Pharmacodynamics

Patients with chronic angina treated with Ranexa in controlled clinical studies had minimal changes in mean heart rate (< 2 bpm) and systolic blood pressure (< 3 mm Hg). Similar results were observed in subgroups of patients with CHF NYHA Class I or II, diabetes, or reactive airway disease, and in elderly patients.

Dose and plasma concentration-related increases in the QTc interval [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ], reductions in T wave amplitude, and, in some cases, notched T waves, have been observed in patients treated with Ranexa. These effects are believed to be caused by ranolazine and not by its metabolites. The relationship between the change in QTc and ranolazine plasma concentrations is linear, with a slope of about 2.6 msec/1000 ng/mL, through exposures corresponding to doses several-fold higher than the maximum recommended dose of 1000 mg twice daily. The variable blood levels attained after a given dose of ranolazine give a wide range of effects on QTc. At T max following repeat dosing at 1000 mg twice daily, the mean change in QTc is about 6 msec, but in the 5% of the population with the highest plasma concentrations, the prolongation of QTc is at least 15 msec. In cirrhotic subjects with mild or moderate hepatic impairment, the relationship between plasma level of ranolazine and QTc is much steeper [see Contraindications (4) ] .

Age, weight, gender, race, heart rate, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and renal impairment did not alter the slope of the QTc-concentration relationship of ranolazine.

No proarrhythmic effects were observed on 7-day Holter recordings in 3162 acute coronary syndrome patients treated with Ranexa. There was a significantly lower incidence of arrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia, bradycardia, supraventricular tachycardia, and new atrial fibrillation) in patients treated with Ranexa (80%) versus placebo (87%), including ventricular tachycardia ≥ 3 beats (52% versus 61%). However, this difference in arrhythmias did not lead to a reduction in mortality, a reduction in arrhythmia hospitalization, or a reduction in arrhythmia symptoms.

Pharmacokinetics

Ranolazine is extensively metabolized in the gut and liver and its absorption is highly variable. For example, at a dose of 1000 mg twice daily, the mean steady-state C max was 2600 ng/mL with 95% confidence limits of 400 and 6100 ng/mL. The pharmacokinetics of the (+) R - and (-) S-enantiomers of ranolazine are similar in healthy volunteers. The apparent terminal half-life of ranolazine is 7 hours. Steady state is generally achieved within 3 days of twice-daily dosing with Ranexa. At steady state over the dose range of 500 to 1000 mg twice daily, C max and AUC 0–τ increase slightly more than proportionally to dose, 2.2- and 2.4-fold, respectively. With twice-daily dosing, the trough:peak ratio of the ranolazine plasma concentration is 0.3 to 0.6. The pharmacokinetics of ranolazine is unaffected by age, gender, or food.

Absorption and Distribution

After oral administration of Ranexa, peak plasma concentrations of ranolazine are reached between 2 and 5 hours. After oral administration of 14 C-ranolazine as a solution, 73% of the dose is systemically available as ranolazine or metabolites. The bioavailability of ranolazine from Ranexa tablets relative to that from a solution of ranolazine is 76%. Because ranolazine is a substrate of P-gp, inhibitors of P-gp may increase the absorption of ranolazine.

Food (high-fat breakfast) has no important effect on the C max and AUC of ranolazine. Therefore, Ranexa may be taken without regard to meals. Over the concentration range of 0.25 to 10 µg/mL, ranolazine is approximately 62% bound to human plasma proteins.

Metabolism and Excretion

Ranolazine is metabolized mainly by CYP3A and, to a lesser extent, by CYP2D6. Following a single oral dose of ranolazine solution, approximately 75% of the dose is excreted in urine and 25% in feces. Ranolazine is metabolized rapidly and extensively in the liver and intestine; less than 5% is excreted unchanged in urine and feces. The pharmacologic activity of the metabolites has not been well characterized. After dosing to steady state with 500 mg to 1500 mg twice daily, the four most abundant metabolites in plasma have AUC values ranging from about 5 to 33% that of ranolazine, and display apparent half-lives ranging from 6 to 22 hours.

Effect of Other Drugs on Ranolazine

In vitro data indicate that ranolazine is a substrate of CYP3A and, to a lesser degree, of CYP2D6. Ranolazine is also a substrate of P-glycoprotein.

Strong CYP3A Inhibitors

Plasma levels of ranolazine with Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily are increased by 220% when co-administered with ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily [see Contraindications (4) ].

Moderate CYP3A Inhibitors

Plasma levels of ranolazine with Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily are increased by 50 to 130% by diltiazem 180 to 360 mg, respectively. Plasma levels of ranolazine with Ranexa 750 mg twice daily are increased by 100% by verapamil 120 mg three times daily [see Drug Interactions (7.1) ].

Weak CYP3A Inhibitors

The weak CYP3A inhibitors simvastatin (20 mg once daily) and cimetidine (400 mg three times daily) do not increase the exposure to ranolazine in healthy volunteers.

Rifampin 600 mg once daily decreases the plasma concentrations of ranolazine (1000 mg twice daily) by approximately 95% [see Contraindications (4) ].

Paroxetine 20 mg once daily increased ranolazine concentrations by 20% in healthy volunteers receiving Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily. No dose adjustment of Ranexa is required in patients treated with CYP2D6 inhibitors.

Plasma concentrations of ranolazine are not significantly altered by concomitant digoxin at 0.125 mg once daily.

Effect of Ranolazine on Other Drugs

In vitro ranolazine and its O-demethylated metabolite are weak inhibitors of CYP3A and moderate inhibitors of CYP2D6 and P-gp. In vitro ranolazine is an inhibitor of OCT2.

The plasma levels of simvastatin, a CYP3A substrate, and its active metabolite are increased by 100% in healthy volunteers receiving 80 mg once daily and Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily [see Drug Interactions (7.2) ]. Mean exposure to atorvastatin (80 mg daily) is increased by 40% following co-administration with Ranexa (1000 mg twice daily) in healthy volunteers. However, in one subject the exposure to atorvastatin and metabolites was increased by

400% in the presence of Ranexa.

The pharmacokinetics of diltiazem is not affected by ranolazine in healthy volunteers receiving diltiazem 60 mg three times daily and Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily.

Ranolazine increases digoxin concentrations by 50% in healthy volunteers receiving Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily and digoxin 0.125 mg once daily [see Drug Interactions (7.2) ].

Ranexa 750 mg twice daily increases the plasma concentrations of a single dose of immediate release metoprolol (100 mg), a CYP2D6 substrate, by 80% in extensive CYP2D6 metabolizers with no need for dose adjustment of metoprolol. In extensive metabolizers of dextromethorphan, a substrate of CYP2D6, ranolazine inhibits partially the formation of the main metabolite dextrorphan.

In subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus, the exposure to metformin is increased by 40% and 80% following administration of ranolazine 500 mg twice daily and 1000 mg twice daily, respectively. If co-administered with Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily, do not exceed metformin doses of 1700 mg/day [see Drug Interactions (7.2) ].

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Ranolazine tested negative for genotoxic potential in the following assays: Ames bacterial mutation assay, Saccharomyces assay for mitotic gene conversion, chromosomal aberrations assay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, mammalian CHO/HGPRT gene mutation assay, and mouse and rat bone marrow micronucleus assays.

There was no evidence of carcinogenic potential in mice or rats. The highest oral doses used in the carcinogenicity studies were 150 mg/kg/day for 21 months in rats (900 mg/m 2 /day) and 50 mg/kg/day for 24 months in mice (150 mg/m 2 /day). These maximally tolerated doses are 0.8 and 0.1 times, respectively, the daily maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 2000 mg on a surface area basis. A published study reported that ranolazine promoted tumor formation and progression to malignancy when given to transgenic APC (min/+) mice at a dose of 30 mg/kg twice daily [see References (15) ]. The clinical significance of this finding is unclear.

In male and female rats, oral administration of ranolazine that produced exposures (AUC) approximatelty 3-fold or 5-fold higher, respectively, than the MRHD had no effect on fertility.

Clinical Studies

Chronic Stable Angina

CARISA (Combination Assessment of Ranolazine In Stable Angina) was a study in 823 chronic angina patients randomized to receive 12 weeks of treatment with twice-daily Ranexa 750 mg, 1000 mg, or placebo, who also continued on daily doses of atenolol 50 mg, amlodipine 5 mg, or diltiazem CD 180 mg. Sublingual nitrates were used in this study as needed.

In this trial, statistically significant (p < 0.05) increases in modified Bruce treadmill exercise duration and time to angina were observed for each Ranexa dose versus placebo, at both trough (12 hours after dosing) and peak (4 hours after dosing) plasma levels, with minimal effects on blood pressure and heart rate. The changes versus placebo in exercise parameters are presented in Table 1. Exercise treadmill results showed no increase in effect on exercise at the 1000 mg dose compared to the 750 mg dose.

Table 1 Exercise Treadmill Results (CARISA)

Mean Difference from Placebo (sec)

Tolerance to Ranexa did not develop after 12 weeks of therapy. Rebound increases in angina, as measured by exercise duration, have not been observed following abrupt discontinuation of Ranexa.

Ranexa has been evaluated in patients with chronic angina who remained symptomatic despite treatment with the maximum dose of an antianginal agent. In the ERICA (Efficacy of Ranolazine In Chronic Angina) trial, 565 patients were randomized to receive an initial dose of Ranexa 500 mg twice daily or placebo for 1 week, followed by 6 weeks of treatment with Ranexa 1000 mg twice daily or placebo, in addition to concomitant treatment with amlodipine 10 mg once daily. In addition, 45% of the study population also received long-acting nitrates. Sublingual nitrates were used as needed to treat angina episodes. Results are shown in Table 3. Statistically significant decreases in angina attack frequency (p=0.028) and nitroglycerin use (p=0.014) were observed with Ranexa compared to placebo. These treatment effects appeared consistent across age and use of long-acting nitrates.

Table 3 Angina Frequency and Nitroglycerin Use (ERICA)

Effects on angina frequency and exercise tolerance were considerably smaller in women than in men. In CARISA, the improvement in Exercise Tolerance Test (ETT) in females was about 33% of that in males at the 1000 mg twice-daily dose level. In ERICA, where the primary endpoint was angina attack frequency, the mean reduction in weekly angina attacks was 0.3 for females and 1.3 for males.

There were insufficient numbers of non-Caucasian patients to allow for analyses of efficacy or safety by racial subgroup.

Lack of Benefit in Acute Coronary Syndrome

In a large (n=6560) placebo-controlled trial (MERLIN-TIMI 36) in patients with acute coronary syndrome, there was no benefit shown on outcome measures. However, the study is somewhat reassuring regarding proarrhythmic risks, as ventricular arrhythmias were less common on ranolazine [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2) ]. and there was no difference between Ranexa and placebo in the risk of all-cause mortality (relative risk ranolazine:placebo 0.99 with an upper 95% confidence limit of 1.22).

REFERENCES

M. A. Suckow et al. The anti-ischemia agent ranolazine promotes the development of intestinal tumors in APC (min/+) mice. Cancer Letters 209(2004):165−9.

How Supplied/Storage and Handling

Ranexa is supplied as film-coated, oblong-shaped, extended-release tablets in the following strengths:

500 mg tablets are light orange, with GSI500 on one side

1000 mg tablets are pale yellow, with GSI1000 on one side

Ranexa (ranolazine) extended-release tablets are available in:

Store Ranexa tablets at 25°C (77°F) with excursions permitted to 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F).

Patient Counseling Information

Advise the patient to read the FDA-approved patient labeling (Patient Information).

Inform patients that Ranexa will not abate an acute angina episode.

Strong CY3PA Inhibitors, CYP3A Inducers, Liver Cirrhosis

Inform patients that Ranexa should not be used with drugs that are strong CYP3A inhibitors (e. g. ketoconazole, clarithromycin, nefazodone, ritonavir) [(see Contraindications (4). Drug Interactions (7.1) ].

Inform patients that Ranexa should not be used with drugs that are inducers of CYP3A (e. g. rifampin, rifabutin, rifapentine, barbiturates, carbamazepine, phenytoin, St. John's wort) [(see Contraindications (4). Drug Interactions (7.1) ].

Inform patients that Ranexa should not be used in patients with liver cirrhosis [(see Contraindications (4). Use in Specific Populations (8.6) ].

Moderate CYP3A Inhibitors, P-gp Inhibitors, Grapefruit Products

Advise patients to inform their physician if they are receiving drugs that are moderate CYP3A inhibitors (e. g. diltiazem, verapamil, erythromycin) [see Drug Interactions (7) ].

Advise patients to inform their physician if they are receiving drugs that are P-gp inhibitors (e. g. cyclosporine) [see Drug Interactions (7) ].

Advise patients to limit grapefruit juice or grapefruit products when taking Ranexa [see Drug Interactions (7) ].

QT Interval Prolongation

Inform patients that Ranexa may produce changes in the electrocardiogram (QTc interval prolongation) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ].

Advise patients to inform their physician of any personal or family history of QTc prolongation, congenital long QT syndrome, or if they are receiving drugs that prolong the QTc interval such as Class Ia (e. g. quinidine) or Class III (e. g. dofetilide, sotalol, amiodarone) antiarrhythmic agents, erythromycin, and certain antipsychotics (e. g. thioridazine, ziprasidone) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ].

Use in Patients with Renal Impairment

Patients with severe renal impairment may be at risk of renal failure while on Ranexa. Advise patients to inform their physician if they have impaired renal function before or while taking Ranexa [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) ].

Inform patients that Ranexa may cause dizziness and lightheadedness. Patients should know how they react to Ranexa before they operate an automobile or machinery, or engage in activities requiring mental alertness or coordination [see Adverse Reactions (6.1) ].

Advise patients to contact their physician if they experience fainting spells while taking Ranexa.

Instruct patients to swallow Ranexa tablets whole, with or without meals, and not to crush, break, or chew tablets. Inform patients that if a dose is missed, to take the usual dose at the next scheduled time. The next dose should not be doubled. Inform patients that doses of Ranexa higher than 1000 mg twice daily should not be used [see Dosage and Administration (2) ].

Advise patients to inform their physician of any other medications taken concurrently with Ranexa, including over-the-counter medications.

Manufactured for: Gilead Sciences, Inc. Foster City, CA 94404

Ranexa is a registered trademark of Gilead Sciences, Inc. © 2016 Gilead Sciences, Inc.

Patient Information Ranexa ® (rah NEX ah) (ranolazine) extended-release tablets Dosing Strengths: 500 mg tablets 1000 mg tablets

Read this Patient Information before you start taking Ranexa and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking with your doctor about your medical condition or treatment.

Ranexa is a prescription medicine used to treat angina that keeps coming back (chronic angina).

Ranexa may be used with other medicines that are used for heart problems and blood pressure control.

It is not known if Ranexa is safe and effective in children.

Who should not take Ranexa?

Do not take Ranexa if:

you take any of the following medicines:

for fungus infection: ketoconazole (Nizoral ® ), itraconazole (Sporanox ®. Onmel™)

for infection: clarithromycin (Biaxin ® )

for depression: nefazodone

for HIV: nelfinavir (Viracept ® ), ritonavir (Norvir ® ), lopinavir and ritonavir (Kaletra ® ), indinavir (Crixivan ® ), saquinavir (Invirase ® )

for tuberculosis (TB): rifampin (Rifadin ® ), rifabutin (Mycobutin ® ), rifapentine (Priftin ® )

for seizures: phenobarbital, phenytoin (Phenytek ®. Dilantin ®. Dilantin-125 ® ), carbamazepine (Tegretol ® )

St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum)

you have scarring (cirrhosis) of your liver

What should I tell my doctor before taking Ranexa?

Before you take Ranexa, tell your doctor if you:

have or have a family history of a heart problem, called 'QT prolongation' or 'long QT syndrome'.

have liver problems.

have kidney problems.

are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Ranexa will harm your unborn baby.

are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. It is not known if Ranexa passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will breast-feed.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take. including all prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Ranexa may affect the way other medicines work and other medicines may affect how Ranexa works.

Tell your doctor if you take medicines:

for your heart

for cholesterol

for diabetes

for infection

for fungus

for transplant

for nausea and vomiting because of cancer treatments

for mental problems

Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them to show your doctor or pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

How should I take Ranexa?

Take Ranexa exactly as your doctor tells you.

Your doctor will tell you how much Ranexa to take and when to take it.

Do not change your dose unless your doctor tells you to.

Tell your doctor if you still have symptoms of angina after starting Ranexa.

Take Ranexa by mouth, with or without food.

Swallow the Ranexa tablets whole. Do not crush, break, or chew Ranexa tablets before swallowing.

If you miss a dose of Ranexa, wait to take the next dose of Ranexa at your regular time. Do not make up for the missed dose. Do not take more than 1 dose at a time.

If you take too much Ranexa, call your doctor, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

What should I avoid while taking Ranexa?

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice. Limit products that have grapefruit in them. They can cause your blood levels of Ranexa to increase.

Ranexa can cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. If you have these symptoms, do not drive a car, use machinery, or do anything that needs you to be alert.

What are the possible side effects of Ranexa?

Ranexa may cause serious side effects, including:

changes in the electrical activity of your heart called QT prolongation. Your doctor may check the electrical activity of your heart with an ECG. Tell your doctor right away if you feel faint, lightheaded, or feel your heart beating irregularly or fast while taking Ranexa. These may be symptoms related to QT prolongation.

kidney failure in people who already have severe kidney problems. Your doctor may need to do tests to check how your kidneys are working.

The most common side effects of Ranexa include:

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of Ranexa. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I store Ranexa?

Store Ranexa tablets at room temperature between 59° to 86°F (15° to 30°C).

Keep Ranexa and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about Ranexa.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in the Patient Information. Do not use Ranexa for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Ranexa to other people, even if they have the same condition you have. It may harm them.

The Patient Information summarizes the most important information about Ranexa. If you would like more information, talk with your doctor. You can ask your pharmacist or doctor for information about Ranexa that is written for health professionals.

For more information, go to www. Ranexa. com or call Gilead Sciences, Inc. at 1-800-445-3235.

What is chronic angina?

Chronic angina means pain or discomfort in the chest, jaw, shoulder, back, or arm that keeps coming back. There are other possible signs and symptoms of angina including shortness of breath. Angina usually comes on when you are active or under stress. Chronic angina is a symptom of a heart problem called coronary heart disease (CHD), also known as coronary artery disease (CAD). When you have CHD, the blood vessels in your heart become stiff and narrow. Oxygen-rich blood cannot reach your heart muscle easily. Angina comes on when too little oxygen reaches your heart muscle.

What are the ingredients in Ranexa?

Active ingredient: ranolazine

Inactive ingredients: 500 mg tablet. carnauba wax, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer (Type C), microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, sodium hydroxide, titanium dioxide, polyvinyl alcohol, talc, Iron Oxide Yellow, and Iron Oxide Red. 1000 mg tablet. carnauba wax, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer (Type C), microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, sodium hydroxide, titanium dioxide, lactose monohydrate, triacetin, and Iron Oxide Yellow.

This Patient Information has been approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration.

Manufactured for: Gilead Sciences, Inc. Foster City, CA 94404

Revised: January 2016

Ranexa is a trademark of Gilead Sciences, Inc. or its related companies. All other trademarks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners.

© 2016 Gilead Sciences, Inc.

PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL - 500 mg Tablet Bottle Label

NDC 61958-1003-1 60 tablets

Ranexa ® (ranolazine extended - release tablets)

Swallow Ranexa tablets whole; do not crush, break, or chew.

PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL - 1000 mg Tablet Bottle Label

NDC 61958-1004-1 60 tablets

Ranexa ® (ranolazine extended - release tablets)

Swallow Ranexa tablets whole; do not crush, break, or chew.

Lisinopril - Blood Pressure, Carpiaton

Lisinopril is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) in adults and children 6 years and older, including renovascular, acute myocardial infarction in clinically stable condition of the patients, heart failure (adjuvant treatment), diabetic nephropathy. The principle of this drug is to relax blood vessels, causing them to expand, it can lead to prevention of occurrence of strokes, heart attacks and kidney problems. Lisinopril is also used after acute myocardial recovery, and is used with other drugs (eg, "water pills" / diuretics, digoxin) to treat heart failure. This drug belongs to a class of medications called ACE inhibitors.

Dosage and direction Take medicine for adults 1 time a day. The dose is determined individually, depending on the evidence, the state of renal function and concomitant therapy. Typically, the initial dose is 2,5-5 mg, the average maintenance dose - 5-20 mg, the maximum daily - 80 mg.

Precautions Treatment is carried out under regular medical supervision (water-electrolyte balance). The process of treatment requires monitoring of blood pressure, protein level and plasma potassium, urea nitrogen, creatinine, renal function, blood picture, body weight and dieting. You have to be careful during surgery (including dental), especially when using general anesthetics that have a hypotensive effect.

Hypersensitivity, pregnancy, breast-feeding.

Possible side effects You can feel headache, dizziness, nervousness, fainting, drowsiness, insomnia, tremors, convulsions, visual disturbances, palpitations, chest pain, hypotension, arrhythmia, dry cough and malignant tumors of the lung, hemoptysis, pain when breathing, bronchitis, dry mouth, indigestion, heartburn, vomiting, diarrhea / constipation, bloating, abdominal pain, renal failure, weakening of libido, impotence, arthritis, neck pain, back pain, rash, urticaria, and syndrome of Stevens - Johnson.

Drug interactions List of the drugs that can interact with Lisinopril: gold injections to treat arthritis, lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith), a potassium supplement such as K-Dur, Klor-Con, salt substitutes that contain potassium, insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth, aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), and others, or a diuretic (water pill).

Missed dose Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Overdose Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Lisinopril overdose symptoms may include feeling extremely dizzy or light-headed, or fainting.

Storage Store Lisinopril at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Disclaimer We provide only general information about medications which does not cover all directions, possible drug integrations, or precautions. Information at the site cannot be used for self-treatment and self-diagnosis. Any specific instructions for a particular patient should be agreed with your health care adviser or doctor in charge of the case. We disclaim reliability of this information and mistakes it could contain. We are not responsible for any direct, indirect, special or other indirect damage as a result of any use of the information on this site and also for consequences of self-treatment.

Didronel - Where To Buy, No Prescription, Discount Coupon, Compare Prices, Sviroxit

Didronel

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Didronel alters the cycle of bone formation and breakdown in the body. It is prescribed to treat Paget's disease, and to treat conditions of irregular bone growth due to hip fracture or spinal cord injury. It may also be prescribed for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while taking Didronel unless otherwise directed by your doctor Do not take Didronel without first talking to your doctor if you have - diarrhea; - a problem swallowing, such as a narrowing of the esophagus; - a stomach or esophageal ulcer or disease; or - kidney disease. Didronel is in the FDA pregnancy category C i. e. it is not known whether it will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take Didronel without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether Didronel passes into breast milk. Do not take Didronel without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not take any other medicine, including vitamins, minerals, or other supplements, within 2 hours before or 2 hours after a dose of Didronel. unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Any drug that is taken within this time frame can decrease the effects of Didronel. Before taking Didronel. tell your doctor if you are taking warfarin (Coumadin). You may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with Didronel. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

Side Effects

Stop taking Didronel and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following serious side effects: - an allergic reactions like difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; - difficulty or pain when swallowing; - pain or burning under the ribs or in the back; or - new or worsening heartburn.

Overdose

Take emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected. Symptoms of an Didronel overdose are not known but nausea, heartburn, pain in the abdomen, diarrhea, muscle cramps, numbness or tingling, uncontrollable facial grimacing, seizures, irritability, and abnormal behavior may be expected to occur. Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and only take the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose.

Intake Guidelines

Take each dose with a full glass (6 to 8 ounces) of tap water or bottled water. Do not eat any food, drink any liquid other than water, or take any medicines (including vitamins and antacids) for at least 2 hours before and 2 hours after a dose of Didronel. Take Didronel exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. Didronel should not be crushed, chewed, or sucked. It should be swallowed. Store Didronel at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Other Brand Names

In some countries Didronel may also be known as: - Detidron; - Difosfen; - Diphos; - Dronate-OS; - Etidrel; - Etidron; - Etiplus; - Feminoflex; - Maxibral; - Oflocin; - Osfo; - Ostedron; - Osteodidronel; - Osteodrug; - Osteum; - Ostogene; - Ostopor; - Sviroxit; - Tilferan;

About Zoltek™ - Zoltek™ Carbon Fiber, Zoltenk

About ZOLTEK™

In the world of materials, carbon fiber has emerged as the ultimate team player – one that works miracles in reinforcing other materials and lifting them to new levels of performance.

At ZOLTEK, we view our role in a similar light.

Our objective as a company is to lead the commercialization of carbon fiber as a primary composite building material. It is our goal to help others achieve new levels of performance across a range of products. Carbon fiber reinforced composites are remarkable in their performance characteristics and properties that include high strength, low weight, high stiffness, corrosion resistance, heat resistance, and electrical conductivity.

Another important characteristic of carbon fiber is its versatility. Carbon fiber has the ability to work with an assortment of different materials, including other fibers, plastics, metals, wood, and concrete. As a result of this versatility, it is impossible to postulate all of the potential uses of carbon fiber in maximizing performance and lowering life-cycle costs across a range of consumer and industrial products, and across all types of construction.

ZOLTEK has become the worldwide leader in rated capacity for producing carbon fiber by making low-cost, high performance carbon fiber through a proprietary continuous carbonization process. Using this knowledge, it is well within our power to truly open the floodgates of demand across a variety of industries.

Commercialization

Our commercial grade 50K ZOLTEK PX35 carbon fibers are the lowest-cost carbon fiber on the market.

We have tailored our operation to support large-volume commercial applications by:

Manufacturing from a low-cost precursor. Our fibers are made from an abundant textile-based precursor material that matches and outperforms “aerospace-grade” carbon fibers in tensile strength and modulus.

Designing and installing our own lines. Our proprietary carbon fiber lines enable us to expand capacity at a fraction of the cost and time that is required by our competitors. This is vital to support large-volume applications that require significant amounts of carbon fiber in a short period of time.

Quality System Certifications

Zoltek Quality Management Systems are certified to the Standards of AS9100C and ISO 9001:2008. Our certifications cover our US / Mexico facilities (St. Charles, Missouri; Abilene, Texas; and Mexico) as well as a separate certificate for our Hungary facility.

Company

ZOLTEK engages in the development, manufacture, and marketing of carbon fibers for various applications. Our carbon fibers are used as the primary building material in commercial products. We sell our commercial grade carbon fibers under the name ZOLTEK PX and our oxidized acrylic fiber under the name ZOLTEK OX. Our operations are primarily in the United States, Mexico and Europe and we sell our products worldwide.

Today ZOLTEK products are increasing the energy output of wind turbines, creating more fuel efficient vehicles, and lifting other industries to higher levels of performance.

Copyright © 2016 ZOLTEK™ Carbon Fiber All rights reserved. Privacy Policy

Buy Generic For Enalabell, Enalabell

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Generic Name: Enalapril

Generic for Enalabell* (Enalapril) is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). It is also used in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Generic for Enalabell* belongs to a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. Lowering high blood pressure helps prevent heart attacks, strokes, and kidney problems. This medicine may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor. Read More>>

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Facts about Generic Drugs

Generic drugs are chemically identical to brand-name drugs in terms of active ingredient(s), intended use, quality, dosage, safety, bioavailability and effectiveness.

Generic drugs are cheaper than brand-name drugs.

What is Generic for Enalabell* used for?

Generic for Enalabell* (Enalapril) is used to treat high blood pressure(hypertension). It is also used in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Generic for Enalabell* belongs to a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. Lowering high blood pressure helps prevent heart attacks, strokes, and kidney problems. This medicine may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

What is the recommended dosage of Generic for Enalabell*?

The dosage of Generic for Enalabell* prescribed to each patient will vary. Always follow your physician’s instructions and/or the directions on the prescription drug label.

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If your physician has instructed or directed you to take Generic for Enalabell* medication in a regular schedule and you have missed a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, then skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double the doses unless otherwise directed.

What if you overdose on Generic for Enalabell*?

Any medication taken in excess can have serious consequences. If you suspect an overdose of Generic for Enalabell*, seek medical attention immediately.

What other drugs could interact with Generic for Enalabell*?

It may be noted that drugs other than those listed above may also interact with Generic for Enalabell*

Usually drug interactions occur when it is taken with another drug or with food. Before you take a medication for a particular ailment, you should inform the health expert about intake of any other medications including non-prescription medications, over-the-counter medicines that may increase the effect of Generic for Enalabell*, and dietary supplements like vitamins, minerals and herbal, so that the doctor can warn you of any possible drug interactions.

Generic for Enalabell* can interact with potassium supplements and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

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Do let your doctor know if you smoke, consume alcohol or caffeinated drinks, or use illegal drugs as these may interfere with the action of your medication. Make sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions you may have, or any family history of medical problems. Do not start or stop using any medicine without consulting your doctor.

What are the side effects of Generic for Enalabell*?

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What are the questions to ask your doctor before taking Generic for Enalabell*?

Is it possible for me to take Generic for Enalabell* with other drugs? Should certain beverages, foods and other products be avoided when I take Generic for Enalabell*? What are the possible drug interactions of Generic for Enalabell*? How will Generic for Enalabell* work in my body? How should Generic for Enalabell* be taken? How to reduce the risk of Generic for Enalabell* drug interactions and side effects?

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Theracap 131, Theracap 131

Preventing and treating symptoms and blockage of airway due to asthma or other lung diseases (eg, emphysema, bronchitis). It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Quibron-T is a xanthine derivative. It works by relaxing the muscle around the airways in the lungs, which allows them to widen and makes breathing easier. It also improves contraction of the diaphragm (the major breathing muscle) and decreases the response of the airways to irritants.

Use Quibron-T as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions. This medicine may be taken on an empty stomach or with food. Try to take this medicine every day at evenly spaced times. If you have questions about the best time to take it, ask your pharmacist.

Some foods may change the effectiveness or increase the side effects of Quibron-T. Talk to your doctor about how you should take Quibron-T with regard to food. Do not suddenly change your diet or eating habits without first checking with your doctor. Take Quibron-T at evenly spaced times throughout the day. Taking Quibron-T at the same time each day will help you remember to take it. Contact your doctor with any questions or concerns about the best way to take Quibron-T. If you miss a dose of Quibron-T, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Quibron-T.

Use Quibron-T as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Store at room temperature away from sunlight and moisture.

Active Ingredient: Theophylline

Do NOT use Quibron-T if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Quibron-T, similar medicines (eg, aminophylline), or xanthines (eg, caffeine, chocolate)

you are using large amounts of other products that contain xanthine (such as chocolate or caffeinated drinks)

you are taking dipyridamole intravenously (IV), febuxostat, halothane, or St. John's wort

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Quibron-T. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have a history of heart problems (eg, congestive heart failure, cor pulmonale), an irregular heartbeat, liver problems (eg, cirrhosis, hepatitis), viral infection, thyroid problems, increased acid levels in the body, brain or nerve problems, or seizures (eg, epilepsy)

if you are in shock or have a fever, an ulcer, a severe infection, cystic fibrosis, or fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema)

if you smoke, are stopping or starting smoking, or are exposed to the smoke from cigarettes or marijuana

if you are in the last 3 months of pregnancy

Important safety information:

Drinking alcohol may increase the risk of side effects of Quibron-T. Talk to your doctor before drinking alcohol while you are taking Quibron-T.

Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Quibron-T before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.

Do not take more than the recommended dose or use more often than prescribed without checking with your doctor. If your symptoms become worse, contact your doctor.

Carry an ID card at all times that says you take Quibron-T.

Avoid large amounts of food or drink that have caffeine (eg, coffee, tea, cocoa, cola, chocolate).

Notify your doctor if you develop a new illness, especially if it is accompanied by fever; if a chronic illness becomes worse; or if you start or stop smoking cigarettes or marijuana.

Tell your doctor if another doctor prescribes a new medicine or tells you to stop using a medicine that you have already been taking. Tell your doctor if you start or stop any medicine, either prescription or over the counter.

Quibron-T will not stop an asthma attack once one has started. Be sure to always carry appropriate rescue medicine (eg, bronchodilator inhaler) with you in case of an asthma attack.

If you have more than one doctor, be sure to tell each of your doctors that you are taking Quibron-T.

Diabetes patients - Quibron-T may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Quibron-T may interfere with certain lab tests. Be sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are taking Quibron-T.

Lab tests, including blood theophylline levels, may be performed while you use Quibron-T. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Use Quibron-T with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects.

Caution is advised when using Quibron-T in CHILDREN, especially children younger than 1 year old; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Children may be more likely to experience mild, temporary behavior changes.

PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor.

You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Quibron-T while you are pregnant. Quibron-T is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Quibron-T, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Irritability; mild, temporary caffeine-like effects (eg, headache, nausea, diarrhea, trouble sleeping); mild, temporary changes in behavior; restlessness; temporary increased urination.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); confusion; dizziness; fast breathing; fast or irregular heartbeat; heart rhythm problems; seizures; severe or persistent nausea, diarrhea, or headache; sleeplessness; tremors; vomiting.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

Nimodipine Side Effects In Detail, Nimodipin

Nimodipine Side Effects

For the Consumer

Applies to nimodipine: oral capsule liquid filled, oral solution, oral tablet

As well as its needed effects, nimodipine may cause unwanted side effects that require medical attention.

Major Side Effects

If any of the following side effects occur while taking nimodipine, check with your doctor immediately:

Less common:

Blurred vision

chest pain or discomfort

confusion

difficult or labored breathing

fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse

lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting

shortness of breath

slow or irregular heartbeat

sweating

swelling

tightness in the chest

unusual tiredness or weakness

Minor Side Effects

Some nimodipine side effects may not need any medical attention. As your body gets used to the medicine these side effects may disappear. Your health care professional may be able to help you prevent or reduce these side effects, but do check with them if any of the following side effects continue, or if you are concerned about them:

Less common:

Abdominal or stomach cramps, discomfort, or pain

back pain

blemishes on the skin

constipation

diarrhea

discouragement

feeling sad or empty

headache

indigestion

irritability

lack or loss of appetite

loss of interest or pleasure

muscle pain

nausea or vomiting

pimples

rash

swollen mouth and tongue

tiredness

trouble concentrating

trouble sleeping

unpleasant taste

urge to have bowel movement

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to nimodipine: oral capsule, oral liquid

Cardiovascular

Cardiovascular effects have frequently been associated with the use of nimodipine, and are related to its vasodilatory properties. Mild to moderate hypotension has been reported in up to 5% of patients, and was the reason less than 1% of patients chose to discontinue therapy. Bradycardia has been reported and may be severe in rare cases. Rare cardiovascular side effects have included tachycardia, hypertension, peripheral edema, dizziness, and flushing. A case of pulmonary vasoconstriction has been associated with the use of this drug. [Ref ]

Nervous system

The incidence of nervous system side effects associated with the use of nimodipine has been similar to placebo in large studies. Headache has been reported in 4% of patients, and is believed to be due to the vasodilatory properties of nimodipine. [Ref ]

Hepatic

Hepatic effects include transient, reversible elevations in liver function tests. [Ref ]

Hematologic

Hematologic side effects are rare and have included thrombocytopenia and anemia. [Ref ]

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal intolerance occurs occasionally. [Ref ]

Dermatologic

Dermatologic effects include occasional cases of rash. [Ref ]

References

1. "Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of nimodipine in acute stroke. Trust Study Group." Lancet 336 (1990): 1205-9

2. Grobe-Einsler R "Clinical aspects of nimodipine." Clin Neuropharmacol 16 (1993): S39-45

3. Jan M, Buchheit F, Tremoulet M "Therapeutic trial of intravenous nimodipine in patients with established cerebral vasospasm after rupture of intracranial aneurysms." Neurosurgery 23 (1988): 154-7

4. Sramek JJ, Heller AH, Sundaresan PR, Lettieri J, Sawin S, Cutler NR "Safety and tolerance of intravenous nimodipine." Ann Pharmacother 28 (1994): 1143-8

5. Lovell AT, Smith M "Pulmonary vasoconstriction following intravenous nimodipine." Anaesthesia 47 (1992): 409-10

6. Fagan SC, Nacci N "Nimodipine and bradycardia in acute stroke--drug or disease?" DICP 25 (1991): 247-9

7. Langley MS, Sorkin EM "Nimodipine. A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic potential in cerebrovascular disease." Drugs 37 (1989): 669-99

8. "Product Information. Nimotop (nimodipine)." Bayer, West Haven, CT.

9. Petruk KC, West M, Mohr G, Weir BK, Benoit BG, Gentili F, Disney LB, Khan MI, Grace M, Holness RO, et al "Nimodipine treatment in poor-grade aneurysm patients. Results of a multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled trial." J Neurosurg 68 (1988): 505-17

10. Florence G, Bonvento G, Roucher P, Charbonne R, Seylaz J "Effect of nimodipine on the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow studied by laser-doppler flowmetry." Brain Res 625 (1993): 301-6

11. Gelmers HJ, Gorter K, de Weerdt CJ, Wiezer HJ "A controlled trial of nimodipine in acute ischemic stroke." N Engl J Med 318 (1988): 203-7

12. Torrealba G, Sharp A, Soto B "Nimodipine-treated subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with acute pseudo-obstruction of the colon." Surg Neurol 28 (1987): 150-2

It is possible that some side effects of nimodipine may not have been reported. These can be reported to the FDA here. Always consult a healthcare professional for medical advice.

Home Page, Liberat

Liberati's Liberati's is your one-stop shop for lunch, dinner and deli items. We offer freshly-made rolls, bread, subs, lasagna, pizza, pepperoni rolls, cannoli, cookies and much more. Always at a price that meets your budget.

We have a deli counter full of quality Italian and American meats and cheese. We also have a wide selection of olives, pasta salads and other specialty Italian deli items.

We also cater. Do you need a customized order for a party, luncheon, or any other gathering? No problem. Call us at 313-928-8000 and one of our friendly associates will help you put together the perfect meal, side dish or dessert. You will easily please any crowd.

** Please click on the "DAILY INFO" tab, at the top of this page, to see our latest updates and new additions to our menu.

Liberati's Italian Deli & Bakery

7607 Allen Road

Ciplocom, Ciplocom

Ciplox is used to treat different types of bacterial infections. It may also be used to prevent or slow anthrax after exposure.

Take Cipro exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take Cipro with a full glass of water (8 ounces). Drink several extra glasses of fluid each day while you are taking this medicine. Cipro may be taken with or without food, but take it at the same time each day. Shake the oral suspension (liquid) for at least 15 seconds just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

When taking the Cipro oral liquid, swallow it without chewing the medicine beads you may notice in the liquid.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Do not take Cipro with dairy products such as milk or yogurt, or with calcium-fortified juice. You may eat or drink these products as part of a regular meal, but do not use them alone when taking Cipro. They could make the medication less effective.

Take Cipro for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Cipro will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Store Cipro at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

If you missed a dose - take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Take exactly as prescribed by your Health Provider.

Store this medicine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

You should not use Ciplox if you are taking tizanidine (Zanaflex), if you have a history of myasthenia gravis, or if you are allergic to ciprofloxacin or similar antibiotics such as gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), and others.

Before taking Ciplox, tell your doctor if you have a heart rhythm disorder, kidney or liver disease, joint problems, diabetes, muscle weakness or trouble breathing, a condition called pseudotumor cerebri, a history of seizures, a history of head injury or brain tumor, low levels of potassium in your blood, a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome, or if you have ever had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic.

Do not take Ciplox with dairy products such as milk or yogurt, or with calcium-fortified juice. Avoid taking antacids, vitamin or mineral supplements, sucralfate (Carafate), or didanosine (Videx) powder or chewable tablets within 6 hours before or 2 hours after you take Ciplox. Ciprofloxacin may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon (the fiber that connects bones to muscles in the body), especially in the Achilles' tendon of the heel. Stop taking Ciplox and call your doctor at once if you have sudden pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or movement problems in any of your joints. Rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions.

You should NOT take Ciplox if:

you are also taking tizanidine (Zanaflex);

you have a history of myasthenia gravis; or

you are allergic to ciprofloxacin or similar medications such as gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), and others.

To make sure you can safely take Ciplox, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart rhythm disorder, especially if you take quinidine (Quin-G), disopyramide (Norpace), bretylium (Bretylol), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), or sotalol (Betapace);

a history of head injury or brain tumor;

a condition called pseudotumor cerebri (high pressure inside the skull that may cause headaches, vision loss, or other symptoms);

a history of allergic reaction to an antibiotic;

joint problems;

kidney or liver disease;

epilepsy or seizures;

diabetes;

muscle weakness or trouble breathing;

low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or

a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Ciplox will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using it. Ciprofloxacin passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Ciplox may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon (the fiber that connects bones to muscles in the body), especially in the Achilles' tendon of the heel. These effects may be more likely to occur if you are over 60, if you take steroid medication, or if you have had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant. Stop taking Ciplox and call your doctor at once if you have sudden pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or movement problems in any of your joints. Rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions. Do not share Ciplox with another person (especially a child), even if they have the same symptoms you have.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Ciplox: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Ciplox and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats;

sudden pain, snapping or popping sound, bruising, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or loss of movement in any of your joints;

diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

confusion, hallucinations, depression, unusual thoughts or behavior;

seizure (convulsions);

severe headache, ringing in your ears, dizziness, nausea, vision problems, pain behind your eyes;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, weakness;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

easy bruising or bleeding;

numbness, tingling, or unusual pain anywhere in your body;

the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild; or

severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious side effects:

nausea, vomiting;

dizziness or drowsiness;

blurred vision;

feeling nervous, anxious, or agitated; or

sleep problems (insomnia or nightmares).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

Ciplox is used to treat different types of bacterial infections. It may also be used to prevent or slow anthrax after exposure.

Take Cipro exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take Cipro with a full glass of water (8 ounces). Drink several extra glasses of fluid each day while you are taking this medicine. Cipro may be taken with or without food, but take it at the same time each day. Shake the oral suspension (liquid) for at least 15 seconds just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

When taking the Cipro oral liquid, swallow it without chewing the medicine beads you may notice in the liquid.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Do not take Cipro with dairy products such as milk or yogurt, or with calcium-fortified juice. You may eat or drink these products as part of a regular meal, but do not use them alone when taking Cipro. They could make the medication less effective.

Take Cipro for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Cipro will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Store Cipro at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

If you missed a dose - take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Take exactly as prescribed by your Health Provider.

Store this medicine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

You should not use Ciplox if you are taking tizanidine (Zanaflex), if you have a history of myasthenia gravis, or if you are allergic to ciprofloxacin or similar antibiotics such as gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), and others.

Before taking Ciplox, tell your doctor if you have a heart rhythm disorder, kidney or liver disease, joint problems, diabetes, muscle weakness or trouble breathing, a condition called pseudotumor cerebri, a history of seizures, a history of head injury or brain tumor, low levels of potassium in your blood, a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome, or if you have ever had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic.

Do not take Ciplox with dairy products such as milk or yogurt, or with calcium-fortified juice. Avoid taking antacids, vitamin or mineral supplements, sucralfate (Carafate), or didanosine (Videx) powder or chewable tablets within 6 hours before or 2 hours after you take Ciplox. Ciprofloxacin may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon (the fiber that connects bones to muscles in the body), especially in the Achilles' tendon of the heel. Stop taking Ciplox and call your doctor at once if you have sudden pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or movement problems in any of your joints. Rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions.

You should NOT take Ciplox if:

you are also taking tizanidine (Zanaflex);

you have a history of myasthenia gravis; or

you are allergic to ciprofloxacin or similar medications such as gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), and others.

To make sure you can safely take Ciplox, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart rhythm disorder, especially if you take quinidine (Quin-G), disopyramide (Norpace), bretylium (Bretylol), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), or sotalol (Betapace);

a history of head injury or brain tumor;

a condition called pseudotumor cerebri (high pressure inside the skull that may cause headaches, vision loss, or other symptoms);

a history of allergic reaction to an antibiotic;

joint problems;

kidney or liver disease;

epilepsy or seizures;

diabetes;

muscle weakness or trouble breathing;

low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or

a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Ciplox will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using it. Ciprofloxacin passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Ciplox may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon (the fiber that connects bones to muscles in the body), especially in the Achilles' tendon of the heel. These effects may be more likely to occur if you are over 60, if you take steroid medication, or if you have had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant. Stop taking Ciplox and call your doctor at once if you have sudden pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or movement problems in any of your joints. Rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions. Do not share Ciplox with another person (especially a child), even if they have the same symptoms you have.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Ciplox: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Ciplox and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats;

sudden pain, snapping or popping sound, bruising, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or loss of movement in any of your joints;

diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

confusion, hallucinations, depression, unusual thoughts or behavior;

seizure (convulsions);

severe headache, ringing in your ears, dizziness, nausea, vision problems, pain behind your eyes;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, weakness;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

easy bruising or bleeding;

numbness, tingling, or unusual pain anywhere in your body;

the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild; or

severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious side effects:

nausea, vomiting;

dizziness or drowsiness;

blurred vision;

feeling nervous, anxious, or agitated; or

sleep problems (insomnia or nightmares).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

Ciplox is used to treat different types of bacterial infections. It may also be used to prevent or slow anthrax after exposure.

Take Cipro exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take Cipro with a full glass of water (8 ounces). Drink several extra glasses of fluid each day while you are taking this medicine. Cipro may be taken with or without food, but take it at the same time each day. Shake the oral suspension (liquid) for at least 15 seconds just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

When taking the Cipro oral liquid, swallow it without chewing the medicine beads you may notice in the liquid.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Do not take Cipro with dairy products such as milk or yogurt, or with calcium-fortified juice. You may eat or drink these products as part of a regular meal, but do not use them alone when taking Cipro. They could make the medication less effective.

Take Cipro for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Cipro will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Store Cipro at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

If you missed a dose - take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Take exactly as prescribed by your Health Provider.

Store this medicine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

You should not use Ciplox if you are taking tizanidine (Zanaflex), if you have a history of myasthenia gravis, or if you are allergic to ciprofloxacin or similar antibiotics such as gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), and others.

Before taking Ciplox, tell your doctor if you have a heart rhythm disorder, kidney or liver disease, joint problems, diabetes, muscle weakness or trouble breathing, a condition called pseudotumor cerebri, a history of seizures, a history of head injury or brain tumor, low levels of potassium in your blood, a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome, or if you have ever had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic.

Do not take Ciplox with dairy products such as milk or yogurt, or with calcium-fortified juice. Avoid taking antacids, vitamin or mineral supplements, sucralfate (Carafate), or didanosine (Videx) powder or chewable tablets within 6 hours before or 2 hours after you take Ciplox. Ciprofloxacin may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon (the fiber that connects bones to muscles in the body), especially in the Achilles' tendon of the heel. Stop taking Ciplox and call your doctor at once if you have sudden pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or movement problems in any of your joints. Rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions.

You should NOT take Ciplox if:

you are also taking tizanidine (Zanaflex);

you have a history of myasthenia gravis; or

you are allergic to ciprofloxacin or similar medications such as gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), and others.

To make sure you can safely take Ciplox, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart rhythm disorder, especially if you take quinidine (Quin-G), disopyramide (Norpace), bretylium (Bretylol), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), or sotalol (Betapace);

a history of head injury or brain tumor;

a condition called pseudotumor cerebri (high pressure inside the skull that may cause headaches, vision loss, or other symptoms);

a history of allergic reaction to an antibiotic;

joint problems;

kidney or liver disease;

epilepsy or seizures;

diabetes;

muscle weakness or trouble breathing;

low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or

a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Ciplox will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using it. Ciprofloxacin passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Ciplox may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon (the fiber that connects bones to muscles in the body), especially in the Achilles' tendon of the heel. These effects may be more likely to occur if you are over 60, if you take steroid medication, or if you have had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant. Stop taking Ciplox and call your doctor at once if you have sudden pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or movement problems in any of your joints. Rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions. Do not share Ciplox with another person (especially a child), even if they have the same symptoms you have.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Ciplox: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Ciplox and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats;

sudden pain, snapping or popping sound, bruising, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or loss of movement in any of your joints;

diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

confusion, hallucinations, depression, unusual thoughts or behavior;

seizure (convulsions);

severe headache, ringing in your ears, dizziness, nausea, vision problems, pain behind your eyes;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, weakness;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

easy bruising or bleeding;

numbness, tingling, or unusual pain anywhere in your body;

the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild; or

severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious side effects:

nausea, vomiting;

dizziness or drowsiness;

blurred vision;

feeling nervous, anxious, or agitated; or

sleep problems (insomnia or nightmares).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

Buy Celesdepot - Betamethasone - Online Without Prescriptions, Celesdepot

Betnovate (Celesdepot)

Betnovate is used to help relieve redness, itching, swelling, or other discomfort caused by skin conditions. This medicine is a corticosteroid (cortisone-like medicine or steroid).

Use Betnovate as directed by your doctor.

Betnovate is for use on the skin only. Do not get it in your eyes.

Wash your hands with soap and water before and after using this medicine.

Apply a thin layer of this medicine to the affected area of the skin. Rub it in gently.

Do not use cosmetics or other skin care products on the treated areas.

Do not bandage or otherwise wrap the skin being treated unless directed to do so by your doctor.

If the medicine is applied to the diaper area of an infant, do not use tight-fitting diapers or plastic pants unless directed to do so by your doctor.

If your doctor ordered an occlusive dressing or airtight covering to be applied over the medicine, make sure you know how to apply it. Occlusive dressings increase the amount of medicine absorbed through your skin, so use them only as directed. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

Using too much of this medicine or using it for a long time may increase your risk of having adrenal gland problems.

If you miss a dose of Betnovate, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For redness, itching, and swelling of the skin:

Adults: Apply to the affected area of the skin one to three times per day.

Children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Betnovate.

Store Betnovate at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Keep Betnovate out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Active Ingredient: Betamethasone.

Do NOT use Betnovate if:

you are allergic to any ingredient in Betnovate

you are taking mifepristone

you have a systemic fungal infection

you are scheduled to have a smallpox vaccine

you have a certain bleeding disorder (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura).

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Some medical conditions may interact with Betnovate. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding

if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement

if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

if you have a history of bleeding problems, heart problems (eg, congestive heart failure [CHF]), heart attack, high blood pressure, kidney problems, liver problems, diabetes, seizures, an underactive thyroid, adrenal gland problems, any mental or mood problems, or low blood potassium levels

if you have or have recently had a bacterial, fungal, malarial, viral, or other type of infection; herpes infection of the eye; chickenpox; measles; shingles; or a head or brain injury

if you have HIV infection or tuberculosis (TB), or if you have ever had a positive TB skin test

if you have any stomach problems (eg, ulcers), intestinal problems (eg, blockage, perforation, infection, unexplained diarrhea, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis), recent intestinal surgery, or inflammation of the esophagus

if you have weak bones (eg, osteoporosis) or muscle problems (eg, myasthenia gravis)

if you have had any recent vaccinations (eg, smallpox)

if you have a history of joint surgery or any joint problems (eg, fracture, infection).

Some medicines may interact with Betnovate. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Aprepitant, clarithromycin, cyclosporine, diltiazem, erythromycin, itraconazole, ketoconazole, or troleandomycin because side effects, such as adrenal gland or nervous system problems (eg, seizures), may occur

Barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital), carbamazepine, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), lithium, or rifampin because they may decrease Betnovate's effectiveness

Aspirin, live vaccines, mifepristone, or ritodrine because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Betnovate.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Betnovate may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Important safety information:

Betnovate may lower the ability of your body to fight infection. Avoid contact with people who have colds or infections. Tell your doctor if you notice signs of infection like fever, sore throat, rash, or chills.

If you have not had chickenpox, shingles, or measles, avoid contact with anyone who does.

Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Betnovate before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.

Diabetes patients - Betnovate may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine.

If you use Betnovate for an extended period of time, your body may not produce enough natural steroids for up to several months after you stop using it. Severe symptoms may occur if you experience injury, surgery, infection, or loss of blood electrolytes. Contact your doctor immediately if you experience any of these events. You may need to begin taking additional corticosteroids.

If you have had Betnovate injected into a joint and you experience increased pain along with swelling, decreased joint movement, fever, and general feeling of being unwell, contact your doctor.

Talk with your doctor before you receive any vaccine while you are using Betnovate.

Lab tests, including adrenal function tests and blood pressure monitoring, may be performed while you use Betnovate. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments.

Betnovate may have benzyl alcohol in it. Do not use it in newborns or infants. It may cause serious and sometimes fatal nervous system problems and other side effects.

Corticosteroids may affect growth rate in children and teenagers in some cases. They may need regular growth checks while they use Betnovate.

Betnovate should be used with extreme caution in children; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Betnovate while you are pregnant. Betnovate is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Betnovate, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

If you suddenly stop taking Betnovate, you may have withdrawal symptoms, These may include unbalanced hormones (in both men and women).

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome:

Acne; clumsiness; dizziness; facial flushing; general body discomfort; headache; increased appetite; increased sweating; lightheadedness; nausea; nervousness; sleeplessness; upset stomach.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry stools; changes in body fat; changes in menstrual periods; changes in skin color; chest pain; easy bruising or bleeding; irregular heartbeat; mental or mood changes (eg, depression); muscle pain, wasting, or weakness; seizures; severe nausea or vomiting; sudden severe dizziness or headache; swelling of feet or legs; symptoms of infection (eg, chills, fever, sore throat); tendon or bone pain; thinning of the skin; unusual skin sensation; unusual weight gain; vision changes or other eye problems; vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

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